A member of the Syrian government forces watches during an evacuation of Syrian rebel fighters and civilians from a opposition-held area of Aleppo on Friday. George Ourfalia/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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George Ourfalia/AFP/Getty Images

A mother holds her baby, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Zika No Longer Global 'Health Emergency,' WHO Declares

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One of these candidates will be the next head of WHO. Top row from left: Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Flavia Bustreo, David Nabarro. Bottom row from left: Miklós Szócska, Sania Nishtar, Philippe Douste-Blazy. Getty Images, AP and WHO hide caption

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Getty Images, AP and WHO

A 2014 photo shows a tuberculosis patient preparing to take his medication at Lal Bahadur Shastri Government Hospital in Varanasi, India. Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP hide caption

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Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

A government worker sprays mosquito insecticide fog in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, earlier this month to block the spread of Zika. The U.S. CDC advises pregnant women to reconsider plans to travel to Malaysia and 10 other countries because of the virus. Joshua Paul/AP hide caption

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Joshua Paul/AP

Pregnant Women Should Consider Not Traveling To Southeast Asia

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Chinashama Sainvilus is one of three babies born with microcephaly at the Mirebalais Hospital in Haiti in July. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Doctors Fear Zika Is A Sleeping Giant In Haiti

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A Syrian Red Crescent team works to evacuate the conjoined twins to a hospital in Damascus on Friday. Courtesy of the Syrian American Medical Society hide caption

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Courtesy of the Syrian American Medical Society

Margaret Chan (left), director general of the World Health Organization, is among the dignitaries visiting a military base in Conakry, Guinea, on a tour of west African countries affected by Ebola. Also pictured: Guinean President Alpha Conde (fourth from right) and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon (right). BINANI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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BINANI/AFP/Getty Images

WHO Aims To Reform Itself But Health Experts Aren't Yet Impressed

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A baby born with microcephaly in Brazil is examined by a neurologist. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

Zika Is Linked To Microcephaly, Health Agencies Confirm

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Health workers fumigate to wipe out mosquitoes in Recife, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

WHO: Birth Defect Linked To Zika Virus Is 'Public Health Emergency'

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Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are displayed at an exhibition on Jan. 28 in Brazil. The mosquitoes can be carriers of the Zika virus. Several cases of the virus have spread to Puerto Rico. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Puerto Rico Health Official 'Very Concerned' About Zika's Spread

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A unidentified family member (right) of a 10-year-old boy that contracted Ebola has her temperature measured by a health worker outside an Ebola clinic on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, on Nov. 20. Liberia, Guinea and Sierra Leone have now gone 42 days without a single reported case of Ebola. Abbas Dulleh /AP hide caption

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Abbas Dulleh /AP