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On the outskirts of Islamabad, a Pakistani health worker vaccinates an Afghan refugee against polio. Muhammed Muheisen/AP hide caption

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Muhammed Muheisen/AP

The Comeback Of Polio Is A Public Health Emergency

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Testing for Ebola, a scientist in a mobile lab at Gueckedou, Guinea, separates blood cells from plasma cells to isolate the virus's genetic sequence. Misha Hussain/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Misha Hussain/Reuters /Landov

Many people like these Tibetans in Qinghai, China, rely on indoor stoves for heating and cooking. That causes serious health problems. Courtesy of One Earth Designs hide caption

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Courtesy of One Earth Designs

A child is immunized against polio at the health clinic in a farming village in northern Nigeria. The procedure involves pinching two drops of the vaccine into the child's mouth. For full protection, the child needs three doses, spaced out over time. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

How To Get Rid Of Polio For Good? There's A $5 Billion Plan

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An Indian boy receives a polio vaccination from an Indian health worker in Amritsar last year. Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Narinder Nanu/AFP/Getty Images

India Marks A Year Free Of Polio

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