Donald Verrilli speaks outside the Supreme Court in Washington after arguments about the death penalty on Jan. 7, 2008. He became solicitor general in 2011. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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The Man Who Argued Health Care For Obama Looks Back As He Steps Down

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Nurse midwife Danielle Kraessig seen meeting with Yakini Branch at the PCC South Family Health Center in Berwyn, Ill., in early 2013. While the federal law requires insurers to cover maternity services, birthing centers and midwifery services aren't always included. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Ailsa Chang reports

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Democratuic Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, who was involved in writing the health law, rejects claims that federal health exchanges won't be able to provide tax credits. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Could The Health Law End Up Back In Court? Opponents Think So

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Back in October 2010, Democrat Jim Oberstar was running for his 19th term in the U.S. House. But he'd voted for the Affordable Care Act and was beaten that November. Today, he says the Supreme Court's ruling that upheld the act is "vindication in spades." Julia Cheng/AP hide caption

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President Obama waves after signing the Affordable Care Act at the White House on March 23, 2010. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chief Justice John Roberts, shown in 2010, is still "finding his role as chief justice," says one law professor. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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California lawmakers have been introducing legislation that would replicate key pieces of the federal law, including bills defining benefits and guaranteeing coverage to people with pre-existing conditions. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Calif. Runs With Health Law Without Waiting On Supreme Court

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Outside the Supreme Court on Sunday, some of those who were lined up to get seats inside the courtroom. Brendan Smialowski /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR's Julie Rovner

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Faith-based groups that share health-care expenses struggle with the question of how much of the burden to share. Stan Rohrer/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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