David Robert Daleiden (right) leaves a courtroom after a hearing in Houston. California prosecutors say two anti-abortion rights activists who made undercover videos of themselves trying to buy fetal tissue from Planned Parenthood have been charged with 15 felony counts of invasion of privacy. State Attorney General Xavier Becerra announced the charges Tuesday. Pat Sullivan/AP hide caption

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Pat Sullivan/AP

California is looking into ways to reduce the use of gas-powered lawn and gardening equipment because they will soon surpass cars as the biggest polluters in the state. stoncelli/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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stoncelli/Getty Images/iStockphoto

California Weighs Tougher Emissions Rules For Gas-Powered Garden Equipment

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Almost 200,000 people were ordered to evacuate after a hole in the emergency spillway in Northern California's Oroville Dam threatened to flood the surrounding area. Climate change could be a factor of extreme flooding in California. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

With Climate Change, California Is Likely To See More Extreme Flooding

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Dr. C. David Molina reviewing medical records in the 1980s. He was a doctor first, then a health insurer. Courtesy of Molina Healthcare hide caption

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Courtesy of Molina Healthcare

This CEO's Small Insurance Firm Mostly Turned A Profit Under Obamacare. Here's How

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Some environmental justice advocates say California's cap-and-trade program hasn't done anything to clean up the air in low-income communities like Wilmington, where refineries are located near residential neighborhoods. Maya Sugarman/KPCC hide caption

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Maya Sugarman/KPCC

Environmental Groups Say California's Climate Program Has Not Helped Them

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Driscoll's, the largest berry producer in the world, now grows about the same quantity of raspberries and strawberries in Mexico as it does in California. Many American producers have recently expanded their production to Mexico. Mike Mozart/Flickr hide caption

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Mike Mozart/Flickr

Why Ditching NAFTA Could Hurt America's Farmers More Than Mexico's

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The Oroville Dam's main spillway as seen on Feb. 14. Crews working round the clock since Sunday have made progress stabilizing this and another spillway damaged by water. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Coeur d'Alene is the largest city and county seat of Kootenai County, Idaho. North Idaho counties like Kootenai have seen their population double since the 1990s. Karen Ybanez/Flickr hide caption

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Karen Ybanez/Flickr

Leaving Urban Areas For The Political Homogeneity Of Rural Towns

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An aerial photo released Saturday by the California Department of Water Resources shows the damaged spillway with eroded hillside in Oroville, Calif. William Croyle/California Department of Water Resources via AP hide caption

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William Croyle/California Department of Water Resources via AP

Signs Of Hope At Oroville Dam, After Overflow Sparked Large Evacuation Sunday

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If passed by voters, the "California Nationhood. Initiative Constitutional Amendment and Statute" would remove state constitutional language making California part of the U.S. and require the governor to request admission to the United Nations. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Coleman, who manages more than 8,000 acres of pistachio trees across California, is worried that warmer temperatures will affect his crops. Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio hide caption

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Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radio

Vineyards remain flooded in the Russian River Valley in Forestville, Calif., on Monday. A massive storm system stretching from California into Nevada saw rivers overflowing their banks, flooded vineyards and forced people to evacuate their homes after warnings that hillsides previously parched by wildfires could give way to mudslides. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Former Attorney General Eric Holder testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington in June 2012. Holder, now in private practice, has signed on to represent the California Legislature as outside legal counsel. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Beverly Kurtz and Tim Guenthner live near Gross Reservoir outside Boulder, Colo. They oppose a an expansion project that would raise the reservoir's dam by 131 feet. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

High Demand, Low Supply: Colorado River Water Crisis Hits Across The West

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UCSF is laying off some of its IT staff and sending their jobs to a contractor with headquarters in India. Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Luciano Lozano/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Outsourced: In A Twist, Some San Francisco IT Jobs Are Moving To India

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