NGC 3597, seen in this Hubble Space Telescope image, is the product of a collision between two good-sized galaxies, and is slowly evolving to become a giant elliptical galaxy. ESA/NASA hide caption

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Near Wins, And Not Quites: How Almost Winning Can Be Motivating
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Actor Matt Damon, who stars as NASA Astronaut Mark Watney in the film The Martian, center, makes hand prints in cement at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Mars Yard in Pasadena, Calif. in Aug. 2015. Damon is shown with Mars Science Lab Project Manager Jim Erickson, left, and NASA Astronaut Drew Feustel. Bill Ingalls/AP hide caption

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How Sound Reveals The Invisible Within Us
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Artist Rogan Brown's paper sculptures are many times larger than the organisms that inspire them. Magic Circle Variation 5 is approximately 39 inches wide by 39 inches tall in its entirety. Brown has created multiple versions of Magic Circle, the shape of which alludes to a petri dish and a microscope lens. Courtesy of Rogan Brown hide caption

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Two mourners kiss outside the Bataclan concert hall, one of the sites of Friday's terrorist attacks in Paris, now adorned with a banner reading "Freedom is an indestructible monument." Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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The World Series of Poker main event in Las Vegas in 2014. When Annie competed in this event, just 3 percent of the entrants were women. AP hide caption

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An Ace Up The Poker Star's Sleeve: The Surprising Upside Of Stereotypes
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Switchtracking, as defined by author Sheila Heen, is when "someone gives you feedback, and your reaction to that feedback changes the subject." Hanna Barczyk for NPR hide caption

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Trying To Change, Or Changing The Subject? How Feedback Gets Derailed
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While wearing a toilet seat on his head, David Hu accepts the Physics Prize, for his research on the principle that mammals empty their bladders of urine in about 21 seconds, from Dudley Herschbach, right, the 1986 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, while being honored during a performance at the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Mass., on Thursday. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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