An artist's rendering of the BEAM inflatable annex attached to the side of the International Space Station. Courtesy of Bigelow Aerospace hide caption

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NASA To Test Inflatable Room For Astronauts In Space

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Tina Buechner da Costa (left) hopes to become Germany's female astronaut. Claudia Kessler (right), CEO of HE Space, is organizing a campaign to send the first German woman into space. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson/NPR hide caption

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Wanted: Female German Astronauts

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With this shot of Mount Fuji, astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted, "your majesty casts a wide shadow!" Scott Kelly/NASA hide caption

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Astronaut's Photos From Space Change How We See Earth

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U.S. astronaut Scott Kelly shows a victory sign after landing safely on Earth after nearly a year in space. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Astronauts Back Home After A Year In Space

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Kelly posted this photo of an aurora taken from the International Space Station to Twitter on Aug. 15, 2015. NASA hide caption

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Scott Kelly Reflects On His Year Off The Planet

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NASA astronaut Scott Kelly takes a selfie inside the cupola, a special module that provides a 360-degree view of Earth. Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko have spent nearly a year aboard the International Space Station. NASA hide caption

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The U.K. coastguard and local boatmen recovered a piece of metal from the sea off the Isles of Scilly in Britain. The debris is likely from the U.S. rocket SpaceX Falcon 9, which blew up after takeoff in June. Handout/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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The Soyuz-U space launch vehicle rocket carrying the Russian cargo ship Progress M-28M launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on Friday. The Progress resupply capsule successfully docked with the International Space Station on Sunday. Sergai Savostyanov/ITAR-TASS/Landov hide caption

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On Friday, a Russian Soyuz rocket will send an unmanned cargo ship with more than 3 tons of food, water and fuel for astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Russian Federal Space Agency hide caption

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Russian Rocket Poised For Crucial Supply Run To Space Station

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A Proton-M rocket shown in 2013. The same type of rocket malfunctioned in mid-flight on Saturday and crashed over Siberia carrying a Mexican communications satellite. PHOTO ITAR-TASS/ITAR-TASS/Landov hide caption

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A Russian launch vehicle carrying the Progress M-27M cargo ship lifts off from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Tuesday. Fears mounted Wednesday that the unmanned cargo capsule was lost and may plunge back to Earth as ground control failed to gain control of the orbiting ship for a second day in a row. Roscosmos /EPA /Landov hide caption

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