Elon Musk, CEO and CTO of SpaceX, introduces the Dragon V2 spaceship at the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif., in May 2014. Musk predicted during an interview at the Code Conference in Southern California on June 1 that people would be on Mars in 2025. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Under NASA's plan, a spacecraft would get to the asteroid in the early 2020s — then pluck a car-sized boulder from the surface and head back toward Earth, to put the boulder in orbit around the moon. NASA hide caption

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NASA

NASA's Other Asteroid Mission: Grab A Chunk And Put It In Orbit Around The Moon

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Alex Longo makes a pitch at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas, in October 2015. The Institute sponsored the conference to pick a landing site for the first human landing on Mars. Long has proposed a site for a different mission — a rover landing. Bill Ingalls/NASA hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/NASA

A Teen Might Pick The Landing Site For NASA's Next Mars Rover

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A Martian gravity map shows the Tharsis volcanoes and surrounding flexure. The white areas in the center are higher-gravity regions produced by the massive Tharsis volcanoes, and the surrounding blue areas are lower-gravity regions that may be cracks in the crust (lithosphere). MIT/UMBC-CRESST/GSFC via NASA hide caption

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MIT/UMBC-CRESST/GSFC via NASA

NASA has set a new launch opportunity, beginning May 5, 2018, for the InSight mission to Mars. This artist's concept depicts the InSight lander on Mars after the lander's robotic arm has deployed a seismometer and a heat probe directly onto the ground. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly takes a selfie inside the cupola, a special module that provides a 360-degree view of Earth. Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko have spent nearly a year aboard the International Space Station. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The Mars rover InSight will not launch as scheduled in March. A seismometer it was supposed to carry has experienced a series of vacuum leaks and cannot be repaired in time. Yang Lei/Xinhua/Landov hide caption

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Yang Lei/Xinhua/Landov

Cocoa pods in Ivory Coast, one of the world's top producers of cocoa. Climate models suggest that West Africa, where much of the world's cocoa is grown, will get drier, which could affect supply. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images

As Big Food Feels Threat Of Climate Change, Companies Speak Up

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An illustration shows what a helicopter drone would look like on the surface of Mars. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Someday A Helicopter Drone May Fly Over Mars And Help A Rover

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The grooves on Mars' moon Phobos could be produced by tidal forces – the mutual gravitational pull of the planet and the moon, says NASA. The theory is the latest explanation for grooves that were once thought to result from the massive impact that caused the Stickney crater (lower right). NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

Solar storms from the sun send charged particles streaming towards Mars. Research now shows those particles are stripping away the atmosphere. NASA/GSFC hide caption

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NASA/GSFC

Researchers Reveal How Climate Change Killed Mars

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