Artist's depiction shows the separation of the Schiaparelli lander from the Trace Gas Orbiter (left) as it heads for the surface of Mars. European Space Agency via AP hide caption

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European Space Agency via AP

A visualization shows what the European Space Agency hopes Schiaparelli's Mars landing looks like. The probe will be making its six-minute descent through the atmosphere on Wednesday. M.Thiebaut/ESA-ATG medialab hide caption

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M.Thiebaut/ESA-ATG medialab

A full-size model of the ExoMars entry, descent and landing module Schiaparelli, with its parachute deployed, was on display in the Netherlands in April. The actual lander is en route to the surface of Mars and set to arrive on Wednesday. ESA hide caption

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ESA

An image of Mars taken on May 12. NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team - STScI/AURA, J. Bell - ASU, M. Wolff - Space Science Institute via AP hide caption

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NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team - STScI/AURA, J. Bell - ASU, M. Wolff - Space Science Institute via AP

Elon Musk, CEO and CTO of SpaceX, introduces the Dragon V2 spaceship at the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, Calif., in May 2014. Musk predicted during an interview at the Code Conference in Southern California on June 1 that people would be on Mars in 2025. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Under NASA's plan, a spacecraft would get to the asteroid in the early 2020s — then pluck a car-sized boulder from the surface and head back toward Earth, to put the boulder in orbit around the moon. NASA hide caption

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NASA

NASA's Other Asteroid Mission: Grab A Chunk And Put It In Orbit Around The Moon

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Alex Longo makes a pitch at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas, in October 2015. The Institute sponsored the conference to pick a landing site for the first human landing on Mars. Long has proposed a site for a different mission — a rover landing. Bill Ingalls/NASA hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/NASA

A Teen Might Pick The Landing Site For NASA's Next Mars Rover

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