Alfonso Ribeiro, best known as Carlton Banks from The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air will host America's Funniest Home Videos for its 26th season starting in the fall. Sam Diephuis hide caption

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Alfonso Ribeiro Wants To Let 'Funniest Home Videos' Shine

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A new Manhattan studio joins YouTube Spaces in London, Tokyo and Los Angeles. Media analysts say YouTube hopes content produced there will ultimately get viewers to stay longer on the site. YouTube hide caption

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Beyond Cat Videos: YouTube Bets On Production Studio 'Playgrounds'

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Jamie Carrillo, in the video she made as she was calling the former teacher whom she accuses of sexual abuse. The video went viral and led to another accuser coming forward and the arrest of the former educator. YouTube hide caption

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Carlos Santana, left, and Marcus Malone when they reunited in Oakland. Malone was part of Santana's band in the late '60s, then spent the past four decades or so living on the streets or in prison. YouTube hide caption

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Caught red-beaked: This eagle grabbed a small wildlife camera in western Australia, flew away with it and then pecked away at the lens. ABC Kimberley hide caption

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Uh-oh. William "Bull" Bullard of the Harlem Globetrotters brought the basket, backboard and stanchion down with him after a dunk. He just missed getting crushed. YouTube.com hide caption

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Jim Wolf of Grand Rapids, Mich. The Army veteran was transformed for a video that the maker hopes will convince people to look at the homeless differently. Screen grabs from the RobBlissCreative video hide caption

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The St. Louis and Boston symphony orchestras are into this year's World Series. They've made a video so that they can talk some trash (and play some music too). YouTube hide caption

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From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Mike Pesca previews the World Series

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