Beyonce's new music video "Formation" is full of social commentary. Via YouTube hide caption

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Via YouTube

Zandria F. Robinson reads from her piece on New South Negress

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Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (center) and Maria Alyokhina (left) leave a police station near Sochi on Feb. 18, 2014. They'd been arrested earlier in the host city of the 2014 Winter Olympics and walked free after being questioned about an alleged theft from a hotel. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

The video for Chinese artist Ai Weiwei's newly released song starts by re-creating the conditions of his captivity during the 81 days he was held in police detention in 2011, and later dissolves into a dystopian nightmare. Courtesy Ai Weiwei hide caption

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Courtesy Ai Weiwei

China's Artist Provocateur Explores New Medium: Heavy Metal

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Ok Go performing "What to Do" -- through the use of only bells -- off their self-titled debut album. Ciro Boro - photo/flickr hide caption

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Ciro Boro - photo/flickr