Demonstrators in Chicago call for an end to gun violence and resignation of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel. Chicago police are under scrutiny following the release of a video showing the shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald by a Chicago police officer. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Crime Spikes As Police Avoid Becoming 'The Next Viral Video'

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Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey, who led the fourth largest police department in the nation, recently announced he would be retiring from the post. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Philadelphia's Retiring Top Cop: 'I've Never Pretended To Be Perfect'

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FBI Director James Comey says police restraint, born from increased scrutiny in the wake of high-profile police killings and evidence of racial bias, may be contributing to an uptick in violent crimes in some cities. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Metropolitan Division officers finish another "rollback" operation. They searched the apartment of a paroled armed robber and gang member. These rollbacks are a cornerstone of the Metro Division's strategy of tracking people who may re-offend, and suppressing crime before it happens. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Nationwide Crime Spike Has Law Enforcement Retooling Its Approach

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Detective Mark Williams (right) speaks with an officer in Richmond, Va. A decade ago, amid a surge in violent crime, Richmond police were identifying relatively few murder suspects. So the police department refocused its efforts to bring up its "clearance rate." Alex Matzke for NPR hide caption

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Open Cases: Why One-Third Of Murders In America Go Unresolved

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Some colleges and police departments are starting to use software that scans social media to identify local threats, but most tips still come from members of the public. Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Awash In Social Media, Cops Still Need The Public To Detect Threats

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New Orleans police officer Patrick Schneider patrols Bourbon Street in the heart of the French Quarter on Saturday. Jason Saul/WWNO hide caption

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French Quarter Sees Violent Crime Surge; Residents Demand Changes

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Theodore Wafer (center) and his attorney Mack Carpenter sit in the back of the courtroom Jan. 15 before his arraignment in Detroit in the shooting death of Renisha McBride. Rebecca Cook/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Los Angeles police officers take a break during a basketball game with residents of the Nickerson Gardens housing project in July 2011. Violent crime at Nickerson Gardens and two nearby housing projects has fallen by almost half since 2010. Thomas Watkins/AP hide caption

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After Years Of Violence, L.A.'s Watts Sees Crime Subside

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