Lee Jae-yong (center), vice chairman of Samsung Electronics, arrives Monday for questioning as a suspect in the corruption scandal that led to the impeachment of South Korea's President Park Geun-Hye. Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jung Yeon-je/AFP/Getty Images

Jay Y. Lee, vice chairman of Samsung, arrives at the Seoul Central District Court on January 18. A judge said there wasn't enough evidence for his arrest on bribery charges. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

J.Y. Lee, vice chairman of Samsung Electronics, arrives at the office of the independent counsel last Thursday in Seoul, South Korea. Prosecutors are now seeking an arrest warrant for Lee. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Arrest Warrant Sought For Samsung Heir In S. Korean Presidential Bribery Scandal

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A banner for State Farm insurance in in D`Iberville, Miss., tells property owners the number to call after Hurricane Katrina hit in 2005. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Product safety field staff send damaged products, such as this burnt battery pack from a defective electric scooter, to the government testing lab in Rockville, Md. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

As Batteries Keep Catching Fire, U.S. Safety Agency Prepares For Change

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Samsung is recalling nearly 3 million top-load washers — but not front-load machines — following reports of excessive vibration that could cause the lids to blow off. David Becker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Becker/Getty Images

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 was a unique, critically acclaimed phone before the company had to recall every unit, including those issued as allegedly safer replacements, over risks of smoke, fire and explosions. Lee Jin-man/AP hide caption

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Lee Jin-man/AP

A woman walks past an ad for the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphone at the company's flagship store in Seoul. SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg/Getty Images

In S. Korea, Samsung's Recall Troubles Come At An Already Crucial Moment

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Workers wash a window at a Samsung shop in Seoul, South Korea, on Wednesday as the corporation works out how to clean up its sullied reputation. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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Ahn Young-joon/AP

Samsung says it is discontinuing production of the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 after reports that its batteries overheat and catch fire. The U.S. government recommends powering down and not using the device even if it is a replacement phone. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP