Ajit Pai, the senior Republican at the Federal Communications Commission, is slated to be the agency's new chairman. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

The Democratic majority of the Federal Communications Commission voted to approve new "net neutrality" rules in February 2015, prompting a court challenge from Internet providers. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Members of Indian Youth Congress — a wing of the National Congress party — and National Students Union of India protest for Internet freedom in April 2015 in New Delhi. Mint/Hindustan Times via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mint/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Should India's Internet Be Free Of Charge, Or Free Of Control?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466298459/466377036" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At the start of a meeting to decide the issue of net neutrality, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler (center) holds hands with FCC Commissioners Mignon Clyburn (left) and Jessica Rosenworcel at the FCC headquarters Thursday. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Republicans in Congress are no fans of FCC Chairman Thomas Wheeler's "net neutrality" plan. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jose Luis Magana/AP

On Net Neutrality, Republicans Pitch Oversight Rather Than Regulation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/389076235/389177498" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

T-Mobile CEO John Legere pitches a plan that allows unlimited music streaming without additional data charges. Some net neutrality proponents want the FCC to limit plans like these; the commission says it will review them on a case-by-case basis. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

What Net Neutrality Rules Could Mean For Your Wireless Carrier

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/388948293/389041468" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler unveiled his plan in a Wired op-ed on Wednesday. The FCC is scheduled to vote on the proposal Feb. 26. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

Randall Stephenson, chairman and CEO of AT&T, introduces President Obama before the latter's remarks Dec. 3 at the quarterly meeting of the Business Roundtable, a group Stephenson chairs. Stephenson has said that increasing regulation of the broadband industry — as proposed by the president — would have a substantial chilling effect on its investment in infrastructure. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pool/Getty Images

Would FCC Plan Harm Telecom Investment? Even Industry Opinion Is Mixed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/383408537/383455007" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Obama called on the Federal Communications Commission to implement a strict policy of net neutrality and to oppose content providers in restricting bandwidth to customers. Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Bocchieri/Getty Images

The Battle Over Open-Internet Rules Shifts To Congress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/378844286/378905707" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Amid much speculation by private security analysts, the FBI stood by its claim this week that North Korea was responsible for the hack against Sony Pictures. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Damian Dovarganes/AP

Nuala O'Connor, president and CEO of the Center for Democracy and Technology, testifies on net neutrality issues before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Slow-loading messages will appear on some of your favorite sites Wednesday as part of a protest for net neutrality. But the sites won't actually be loading slower — the banners will be displayed just to make a point. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto