We know it's not really about Mr. Stork. But we might not be up to speed on key aspects of conception. Jens Bonnke/ImageZoo/Corbis hide caption

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You tried burping. You tried bouncing. You tried swaddling. Now what? iStockphoto hide caption

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Nurse Carina Araujo gives care to a child in the neonatal intensive care unit at Maternidade Doutor Alfredo da Costa Hospital in Lisbon, Portugal, on June 6. Portugal's birthrate has dropped 14 percent since the economic crisis hit. The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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He's not just getting a cold. He's building his microbiome. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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In a study of 4,000 pregnant women, fish accounted for only 7 percent of blood mercury levels. JackF/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Sucking may be one of the most beneficial ways to clean a baby's dirty pacifier, a study found iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Renande Raphael, aged 16 months, is measured to check whether she is growing normally. She's part of a trial in Haiti to see if an extra daily snack of enriched peanut butter prevents stunting and malnutrition. Alex E. Proimos/via flickr hide caption

itoggle caption Alex E. Proimos/via flickr