Twin girls born with extremely small heads, shrunken spinal cords and extra folds of skin around the skull. Scientists think this skin forms when the skull collapses onto itself after the brain —€” but not the skull —€” stops growing. The images of the girls' heads were constructed on the computer using CT scans taken shortly after birth. The girls were infected with Zika at 9 weeks gestation. Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America hide caption

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Toddlers need consistent care from a pediatrician to make sure, among other things, that they are hitting developmental milestones and their vaccinations are up-to-date. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Food writer Bee Wilson says that babies are most open to trying new flavors between the ages of 4 and 7 months. Duane Ellison/iStock hide caption

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In Baby's 'First Bite,' A Chance To Shape A Child's Taste

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Fetal Cells May Protect Mom From Disease Long After The Baby's Born

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A free pregnancy test dispenser hangs next to a condom dispenser in the women's restroom at the Peanut Farm bar in Anchorage. Anne Hillman/KSKA hide caption

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Will Pregnancy Tests In Alaska Bars Dissuade Moms-To-Be From Drinking?

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The number of women buying, selling and sharing breast milk is growing rapidly. But it can be a risky purchase, scientists say, because a mom can't tell by looking at the milk whether it's safe and nutritious for her baby. iStockphoto hide caption

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Breast Milk Sold Online Contaminated With Cow's Milk

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A mother feeds her new baby at the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan, which has the highest maternal mortality rate in the world. About 1 in 7 women in South Sudan die from causes related to pregnancy. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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