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Babies exposed to opioids in utero may experience withdrawal symptoms at birth, but these symptoms are treatable. Typically, the babies can go home after a few days or a couple weeks. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

For Newborns Exposed To Opioids, Health Issues May Be The Least Of Their Problems

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Babies get less sleep at night and sleep for shorter stretches when they sleep in their parents' room after 4 months old, a new study finds. Daniela Jovanovska-Hristovska/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniela Jovanovska-Hristovska/Getty Images

Twins Ryan and Nell Stimpert lie in their baby boxes at home in Cleveland. The cardboard boxes are safe and portable places for the babies to sleep. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Twin girls born with extremely small heads, shrunken spinal cords and extra folds of skin around the skull. Scientists think this skin forms when the skull collapses onto itself after the brain —€” but not the skull —€” stops growing. The images of the girls' heads were constructed on the computer using CT scans taken shortly after birth. The girls were infected with Zika at 9 weeks gestation. Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America hide caption

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Courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

Toddlers need consistent care from a pediatrician to make sure, among other things, that they are hitting developmental milestones and their vaccinations are up-to-date. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images

Food writer Bee Wilson says that babies are most open to trying new flavors between the ages of 4 and 7 months. Duane Ellison/iStock hide caption

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Duane Ellison/iStock

In Baby's 'First Bite,' A Chance To Shape A Child's Taste

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Joseph Daniel Fiedler for NPR

Fetal Cells May Protect Mom From Disease Long After The Baby's Born

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