As they travel the parade route, tuxedoed men and youths distribute strings of colorful beads, dried fava beans and genuine Italian kisses. Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of The Italian American St. Joseph Society

Tom Conner, the current owner of Conner Bottling Works, is part of the fourth generation of the family-owned business. Todd Bookman/New Hampshire Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Todd Bookman/New Hampshire Public Radio

In 2014, about 2,300 people in Seoul made 250 tons of kimchi, a traditional fermented South Korean pungent vegetable dish, to donate to neighbors in preparation for winter. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ahn Young-joon/AP

How South Korea Uses Kimchi To Connect To The World — And Beyond

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/489805398/490895650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A still image from the documentary The Eagle Huntress. The film follows teenager Aisholpan Nurgaiv, the first female in a traditionally male role, as she trains a golden-eagle chick to hunt in Mongolia. Asher Svidensky/Kissaki Films hide caption

toggle caption
Asher Svidensky/Kissaki Films