In a photo from March 2011, then-U.S. Ambassador to Japan John Roos visits the Tohoku region, hardest hit by the tsunami and earthquake. He and his team then started the Tomodachi (Friends) Initiative to help young survivors. Ben Chang/Courtesy of John Roos hide caption

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After Tsunami And Quake, A U.S.-Japan Partnership To 'Give Hope'

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Elderly women walk together down a road lined with temporary homes in Fukushima prefecture, two hours from the radiation-affected coast. Kosuke Okahara for NPR hide caption

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5 Years After Japan Disasters, 'Temporary' Housing Is Feeling Permanent

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Part of the main street in Hilo, Hawaii, was flattened by a tsunami in April 1946. That big wave was triggered by a quake near the Aleutian Islands, where the edges of two tectonic plates continue to collide. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Aleutian Quake Zone Could Shoot Big Tsunamis To Hawaii, California

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Locals working for a UNDP cash-for-work program clear debris in one of the neighborhoods worst affected by the typhoon that hit Tacloban, Philippines, last November. Tim Walsh runs the program, which he hopes will help keep the local economy going. RV Mitra/UNDP/Flickr hide caption

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Turning A Million Cubic Yards Of Post-Typhoon Trash Into Jobs

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A man rides a motorcycle near houses that were rebuilt in an area in Banda Aceh, the capital of Indonesia's Aceh province, that was devastated by the tsunami that hit on Dec. 26, 2004. Heri Juanda/AP hide caption

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From The Ruins Of A Tsunami, A Rebuilt Aceh Rises Anew

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