For more than 70 years, the false bottom on this mug hid a Holocaust victim's treasures. Mirosław Maciaszczyk/Auschwitz Museum hide caption

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For 70 Years, A Mug In Auschwitz Held A Secret Treasure

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Czech Republic's President Milos Zeman (left) decorates Nicholas Winton with the Czech Republic's highest decoration, The Order of the White Lion, in Prague, on Oct. 28, 2014. Winton, a British citizen who died last year at age 106, saved 669 mostly Jewish children from the Nazis by transporting them out of Prague to Great Britain in 1939. Petr David Josek/AP hide caption

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'Britain's Schindler' Is Remembered By Those He Saved From The Nazis

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A kindergarten teacher in Jerusalem stands with students as they listen to sirens that played nationwide on Thursday to commemorate Holocaust Remembrance Day. This year, a new national Holocaust curriculum is being fully implemented in kindergarten. Ellen Krosney for NPR hide caption

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In Israeli Kindergartens, An Early Lesson In The Holocaust

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South America has a tradition of offering a haven to refugees, including my grandfather, Miguel Garsd, pictured here in Argentina, where he began practicing medicine in the 1930s. His family had fled pogroms in the Ukraine in the late 1800s. Courtesy of Jasmine Garsd hide caption

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French far-right National Front founder Jean-Marie Le Pen arrives for a news briefing at party headquarters in Nanterre, near Paris, on Thursday. The executive committee decided to expel Le Pen from the party over remarks downplaying the Holocaust. Christian Hartmann/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Auschwitz survivor Eva Kor sits in a courtroom in Lueneburg, northern Germany, on April 21, 2015. She testified at the trial of 93-year-old former Auschwitz guard Oskar Groening. Julian Stratenschulte/AP hide caption

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'It's For You To Know That You Forgive,' Says Holocaust Survivor

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Author Hopes Holocaust-Themed Picture Book Will Prompt Conversations

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Jack Mandelbaum, a Holocaust survivor from the Polish city of Gdynia, poses in front of a photograph showing him as a youth. Tobias Schwarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A Holocaust Survivor, Spared From Gas Chamber By Twist Of Fate

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James Snyder, director of the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, with Egon Schiele's 1915 work, Krumau Town Crescent I. It's one of about 1,000 works of Nazi-confiscated art the museum has received. The museum has no record of who owned the painting before it was taken by the Nazis. In some 40 cases, the museum has returned artworks when heirs were found. Daniel Estrin for NPR hide caption

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7 Decades On, Israel Still Seeks Resolutions For 'Holocaust Art'

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Raphael Lemkin is the Polish lawyer and linguist who coined the term "genocide" — and dedicated his life to making genocide recognized as a crime. Copyright by Arthur Leipzig /Courtesy of Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York hide caption

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The Man Who Coined 'Genocide' Spent His Life Trying To Stop It

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The names of Jeffrey Katz's family members are depicted on "stumbling stones" in Lembeck, Germany. His relatives owned a home on the property near the stones, before they were evicted in 1942. Jeffrey Katz/NPR hide caption

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Leslie Gilbert-Lurie reads an excerpt from Bending Toward the Sun.

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