A satellite image shows Tropical Storm Hermine forming in the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday. The storm is expected to make landfall north of Tampa late Thursday night or early Friday morning, the National Hurricane Center says. NASA/NOAA GOES Project hide caption

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Alejandra Ventura lifts her dog out of the water after the Brazos River topped its banks and flooded a mobile home park in Richmond, Texas, on Tuesday. Daniel Kramer/Reuters hide caption

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Inundated With Rain, Texas Residents Brace For More This Week

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Rwanda is known as "le pays des milles collines" €-- the land of a thousand hills. Weather varies by altitude; for farmers, detailed forecasts can make a huge difference. Francesco Fiondella/International Research Institute for Climate and Society hide caption

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This image, made from a video taken through a car window, shows a tornado near Wynnewood, Okla., on Monday. A broad tornado capable of leaving "catastrophic" damage in its wake churned across the Oklahoma landscape Monday, prompting forecasters to declare a tornado emergency for two communities directly in its path. Hayden Mahan/AP hide caption

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Despite the ongoing drought in California, the Folsom Lake reservoir is kept at only 60 percent capacity in the winter to prevent major flooding if a winter storm occurs. Some hope to prevent the waste of water by relying on more accurate weather predictions. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hide caption

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In California, Dealing With A Drought And Preparing For A Flood

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New York City called a travel ban on vehicles in Times Square and elsewhere during last weekend's storm, which broke snowfall records all along the Mid-Atlantic coast. Yana Paskova/Getty Images hide caption

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A Big El Niño Was The Likely Instigator Of Last Week's Blizzard

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A fallen tree rests atop a pickup truck in Holly Springs, Miss., after a storm struck the town on Wednesday. A storm system killed several people as it swept across the South. Phillip Lucas/AP hide caption

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Using an instrument they've named the HOLODEC, for Holographic Detector for Clouds, scientists can now see in fine detail the way air and water droplets mix at a cloud's wispiest edge. iStockphoto hide caption

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What's At The Edge Of A Cloud?

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A photo from May shows Gino Celli checking his parched crops near his farm near Stockton, Calif. If predictions of a strong El Niño prove true, it could presage a relief from the region's prolonged drought. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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