LGBT community LGBT community

The month of June, which is celebrated as gay pride month, has been particularly fraught for one subset of the LGBT community: Trump supporters. In Los Angeles the Pride Parade morphed into a Resist March to stand against the administration's policies. Emma McIntyre/Getty Images hide caption

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Emma McIntyre/Getty Images

Phoenix residents (left to right) Brendan Mahoney, Jenni Vega and Tony Moya all felt shocked and scared on the night of the recent presidential election. They worry about their rights as LGBT people, but more so, they worry for others more vulnerable than themselves, especially Muslims and people who are in the country illegally. Stina Sieg/KJZZ hide caption

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Stina Sieg/KJZZ

LGBT Community Worries Extend Beyond Itself To Other, More Vulnerable People

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People celebrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington on June 26, 2015, after its historic decision on gay marriage. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

LGBT Rights Activists Fear Trump Will Undo Protections Created Under Obama

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The White House was illuminated in rainbow-colored light on June 26, 2015, after the Supreme Court issued a ruling that made same-sex marriage legal nationwide. Drew Angerer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Not Always A 'Thunderbolt': The Evolution Of LGBT Rights Under Obama

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The American Family Association is calling for a boycott of Target after the company announced that its employees and customers should use the dressing room or bathroom that "corresponds with their gender identity." Chris Hondros/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Citing feedback over HB2, Gov. Pat McCrory said that he has seen "misinformation, misinterpretation, confusion, a lot of passion and frankly, selective outrage and hypocrisy." Screen shot by NPR hide caption

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Screen shot by NPR

South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard vetoed a bill that would have required transgender students in public schools to use bathrooms based on their gender at birth. James Nord/AP hide caption

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James Nord/AP

A religious activist is carried away by police after he tried to stop a gay pride parade in Seoul last year. Christian activists are planning to disrupt the parade again this year. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images

A Showdown Looms At South Korea's Gay Pride Parade

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Josh Kronberg-Rasner was the only openly gay employee at a food service company in Casper, Wyo. He was fired in 2012 shortly after being assigned a new manager. Miles Bryan/Wyoming Public Media hide caption

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Miles Bryan/Wyoming Public Media

For People Fired For Being Gay, Old Court Case Becomes A New Tool

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San Francisco City Supervisor David Campos (right) walks with drag queen Sister Roma to a news conference on Sept. 17 about a Facebook policy that requires people to use their "real" names on their profiles. The site said Wednesday it will modify how the policy is enforced. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP