The picturesque town of Odense — the birthplace of Hans Christian Andersen — is one of the Danish cities battling ISIS and its recruitment efforts. Denmark has one of the worst radicalization problems in Europe. Joao Alves/Flickr hide caption

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Joao Alves/Flickr

To Stop Kids From Radicalizing, Moms In Denmark Call Other Moms

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A Danish policeman checks passengers' identity papers on a train arriving from Germany on Jan. 6. Officials say the small country is overwhelmed by the number of refugees seeking asylum. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Denmark's Mixed Message For Refugees

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Danish police conduct spot checks on incoming traffic from Germany at a highway border crossing near Padborg, Denmark, on Jan. 6. Officials say they've been overwhelmed by the 20,000 asylum seekers who came to Denmark last year. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Denmark Wants To Become 'A Little Bit Less Attractive' To Refugees

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Photographers take pictures of the lion carcass before it's publicly dissected at Odense Zoo in Denmark. It was the zoo's second public dissection of a lion in four months. Sidsel Overgaard for NPR hide caption

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Sidsel Overgaard for NPR

Danes Say Zoo Dissections Fit With Country's 'Very Honest' Parenting

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Migrants, mostly from Syria and Iraq, set out on foot along a highway on the Danish-German border, heading north to Sweden on Wednesday. They arrived that morning on a train from Germany. CLAUS FISKER/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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CLAUS FISKER/AFP/Getty Images

Migrants Enter Denmark, Determined To Reach Sweden

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Copenhagen, Denmark - October 11, 2014: fruits and vegetables stalls at market in Copenhagen. Customers are choosing goods for themselves. These stalls is located between market halls where one can find over 60 stands with everything from fresh fish and meat, as well as small places to get a quick bite. It is located near Nørreport metro station. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

Near the Danish city of Ikast, some 1,500 spectators gathered on April 19 to celebrate what has become something of a national holiday at organic dairy farms around Denmark. Courtesy of Organic Denmark hide caption

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Courtesy of Organic Denmark

Damaged glass is seen at the site of a shooting in Copenhagen on Saturday. Shots were fired near a meeting in the Danish capital that was attended by controversial Swedish artist Lars Vilks. Scanpix Denmark/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Scanpix Denmark/Reuters/Landov

Ritually slaughtered lamb is delivered at a halal butcher shop in The Hague, Netherlands, in 2011. Denmark, Sweden and Norway are among the countries requiring animals to be stunned before slaughter. Dutch lawmakers took up the issue in 2012. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Banning Traditional Animal Slaughter, Denmark Stokes Religous Ire

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The lions at the Copenhagen Zoo eat the remains of a healthy young giraffe named Marius in February. It's unclear whether the lion pictured was one of those euthanized. Kasper Palsnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kasper Palsnov/AFP/Getty Images

The Nordic Food Lab in Copenhagen is where chefs and social scientists explore the raw materials and flavors of Scandinavia. Courtesy of the Nordic Food Lab hide caption

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Courtesy of the Nordic Food Lab

A view of the Paharganj area is pictured in New Delhi on Wednesday. Police were questioning a group of men after a Danish woman says she was robbed and then gang-raped in the heart of the Delhi's tourist district. Vijay Mathur/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Vijay Mathur/Reuters/Landov

Inside the drug consumption room in Aarhus, Denmark's second-largest city. Sidsel Overgaard for NPR hide caption

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Sidsel Overgaard for NPR

Denmark's 'Fix Rooms' Give Drug Users A Safe Haven

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Workers stand inside the gold mine in Greenland's Nulanaq mountain in 2009. The Danish territory's underground wealth was at the forefront of elections in March. Now, Greenland faces another dilemma: whether to end a zero-tolerance policy on uranium extraction. Adrian Joachim/AP hide caption

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Adrian Joachim/AP

As Greenland Seeks Economic Development, Is Uranium The Way?

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The facade of Noma in Copenhagen. More than 60 diners complained of nausea and diarrhea after eating at the widely acclaimed restaurant last month. Dresling Jens/AP hide caption

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Dresling Jens/AP