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It's not clear how living in a segregated neighborhood affects blood pressure, but stress is one potential cause, experts say. annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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annebaek/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Leaving Segregated Neighborhoods Lowers Blacks' Blood Pressure

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The hemoglobin A1C test for blood sugar, a standard assay for diabetes, may not perform as well in people with sickle cell trait, a study finds. fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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fotostorm/Getty Images/iStockphoto

The A1C Blood Sugar Test May Be Less Accurate In African-Americans

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Looking out at the Atlantic Ocean from Elmina Castle, I felt the pull of different forebears. Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria hide caption

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Courtesy of Kainaz Amaria

Finding A Way Home Through 'The Door Of No Return'

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Lack of access to quality medical care remains a major factor in higher breast cancer death rates among African-Americans. Deborah Jaffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Deborah Jaffe/Getty Images

Dallas Police Chief David Brown (second from left) and Dallas Area Rapid Transit Police Chief James Spiller (second from right) attend an interfaith memorial service for the victims of the Dallas police shooting. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

The Code Switch Podcast, Episode 8: Black And Blue

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Zunika Crenshaw helps her 3-year-old daughter Jhase Crenshaw Bass with an asthma inhaler. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

Scientists Seek Genetic Clues To Asthma's Toll On Black Children

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Life Expectancy Drops For White Women, Increases For Black Men

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People attend a job fair in October, 2015, at Dolphin Mall in Miami. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Unemployment May Be Dropping, But It's Still Twice As High For Blacks

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Diana Venegas, a nursing student at Samuel Merritt University, in Oakland, Calif., takes a patient's blood pressure at a recent health fair at Allen Temple Baptist Church. Adizah Eghan/KQED hide caption

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Adizah Eghan/KQED

For decades, black women faced lower risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer than did white women. ColorBlind Images/Blend Image/Corbis hide caption

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ColorBlind Images/Blend Image/Corbis

"Because he wasn't raised where health was an issue in the household. There was nobody talkin' about health, probably nobody talking about not smoking or drinking or unhealthy practices, what it could lead to. There was nobody talkin' about that." National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion hide caption

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National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Is Obama Finally Becoming The President African-Americans Wanted?

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