Preparations underway in the Media Center at the third Republican debate on the campus of the University of Colorado in Boulder, Colo. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Unless Congress raises the debt limit by Nov. 3, the U.S. Treasury may be left with only incoming taxes and fees to cover expenses, which would not be enough to pay all bills. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A woman looks on at the U.S. Capitol in 2013 after the most recent government shutdown. Congress has made no progress toward avoiding a government shutdown when it will run out of funding Sept. 30. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Congress Quietly Extends The Budget — Past Election Day, Anyway

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House Speaker John Boehner, Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy (left), and Majority Leader Eric Cantor (right) were among the 28 Republicans whose votes made it possible for most other Republicans to vote against the debt ceiling hike. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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House Speaker John Boehner and his fellow Republicans could give President Obama the clean debt ceiling increase he wants but not for the reasons the president wants it. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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House Speaker John Boehner shows his softer side Thursday before resuming his tough guy role in the fiscal fight. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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