A trader fills orders Monday in the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index options pit at the Chicago Board Options Exchange. Watching market numbers plummet can make investors queasy, but analysts say keeping a level head through volatility is the best course. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Keep Calm And Carry The 1: Investors Often Miscalculate Amid Volatility

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Traders signal offers Monday in the Standard & Poor's 500 stock index options pit at the Chicago Board Options Exchange. Major market indexes tumbled around the world amid worries about China's slowing economy. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Don't Panic About Stocks. It's Not 2008 All Over Again, Economist Says

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Curtis Carroll — also known as "Wall Street" — teaches prisoners at San Quentin State Prison about stocks. The Kitchen Sisters hide caption

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Inmate With Stock Tips Wants To Be San Quentin's Warren Buffett

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A Chinese worker is seen at a construction site in Beijing. Economic changes in China and in other places have reduced demand and prices for commodities like the metal in the building's structure. AP hide caption

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As the Nasdaq closes above the record set 15 years ago, stock analysts are debating whether the market is approaching another bubble. Bryan Thomas/Getty Images hide caption

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15 Years After The Dot-Com Bust, A Nasdaq Record

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A trader stands outside the New York Stock Exchange on Oct. 31, 2012. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Markets May Stumble Or Skyrocket, But This Economist Says Hold On Tight

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James Franco (left) and Seth Rogen, stars of The Interview, arrive for the film's Los Angeles premiere on Dec. 11. The comedy about a CIA plot to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong Un was pulled from theaters after a cyberattack on Sony Pictures, the studio behind the film. The FBI said the attack was traced to the North Korean government. Jim Ruymen/UPI/Landov hide caption

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Traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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In this Oct. 20, 2012 photo, people line up to enter a newly opened Apple Store in Beijing. Exxon has once again surpassed Apple as the world's most valuable company after the iPhone and iPad maker saw its stock price falter. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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