manufacturing manufacturing

Faced with a string of resignations from his advisory panels, President Trump has disbanded two groups he had formed to provide policy and economic guidance. He's seen here after a news conference Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence stop to looks at a Caterpillar truck, manufactured in Illinois, on the South Lawn of the White House on Monday during a "Made in America" product showcase. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

A factory worker in Jackson, Minn., uses Google Glass on the assembly line. Courtesy of AGCO hide caption

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Courtesy of AGCO

Google Glass Didn't Disappear. You Can Find It On The Factory Floor

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President-elect Donald Trump tours the Carrier Corp. in Indianapolis following the company's announcement it would keep hundreds of manufacturing jobs in the United States rather than move them to Mexico. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images

U.S. Manufacturers Brace For Trump's Next Trade Targets

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President-elect Donald Trump greets attendees after speaking during an event at Carrier Corp. in Indianapolis on Thursday. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Students leave school at the end of the day at the Global Impact STEM Academy. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

A City Looks To STEM School To Lift Economy, But Will Grads Stay?

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Kids bike on Selma Road in Springfield, Ohio. "Springfield is a rather typical small city that has grown poorer over the years," former mayor Roger Baker says. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Springfield, Ohio: A Shrinking City Faces A Tough Economic Future

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Brazlian jet maker Embraer employs about 600 people in Melbourne, Fla., and is expanding. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

With Shuttles Gone, Private Ventures Give Florida's Space Coast A Lift

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This prototype built by MIT researchers can be reconfigured to manufacture different types of pharmaceuticals. Courtesy of the Allan Myerson lab hide caption

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Courtesy of the Allan Myerson lab

Inventing A Machine That Spits Out Drugs In A Whole New Way

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An engine is assembled at a Cummins plant in Columbus, Ind., in 2007. The Fortune 500 company sells diesel engines around the world. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

As Factory Jobs Slip Away, Indiana Voters Have Trade On Their Minds

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A Carrier air conditioner in 2009. The company has drawn criticism for announcing plans to close its plant in Indiana and relocate jobs to Mexico. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Nati Harnik/AP

Moving Air Conditioning Jobs To Mexico Becomes Hot Campaign Issue

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Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange in New York on Jan. 4. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Analysts: Markets May Be Underestimating U.S. Economic Resilience

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(Top) A worker at Blue Creations prepares a pair of blue jeans for a crinkle effect known as "3-D whiskers." (Bottom) Employees at Blue Creations apply the destruction/distressing process to jeans by sanding, ripping and tearing them on molds. John Francis Peters for NPR hide caption

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John Francis Peters for NPR

From Pocket Lining To Jeans, A Niche Means Survival In LA Fashion

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Los Angeles is a sprawling metropolis, and it was poised to become a manufacturing giant because of its unique geography. John Francis Peters for NPR & Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR hide caption

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John Francis Peters for NPR & Shereen Marisol Meraji/NPR

What Gets Made In LA Is Way More Than Movies

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Inmates Ted Stancil (from left), Steven Bass and Christopher Peeples, with their welding Instructor Jeremy Worley (standing in center) at Walker State Prison in Georgia. The inmates are working toward a welding certificate. Susanna Capelouto/WABE hide caption

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Susanna Capelouto/WABE

Amid A Shortage Of Welders, Some Prisons Offer Training

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