Construction workers pour concrete at 1 a.m. in Chandler, Ariz. Sarah Ventre/KJZZ hide caption

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When The Going Gets Hot, Construction Workers Get Nocturnal

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A worker in Claysville, Pa., shovels the fine powder that's part of a watery mixture used in hydraulic fracturing. Silica dust is created in a wide variety of construction and manufacturing industries, too. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Tighter, Controversial Silica Rules Aimed At Saving Workers' Lungs

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The $1 billion Brickell City Centre, currently under construction, will house condos, a hotel and a retail and entertainment complex. Condo projects are booming in Miami, financed mostly by foreign buyers. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Foreign Dollars Fuel A New Condo Boom In Miami

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After laying off roughly 2 million workers during the recession, the construction industry may not have enough crews to keep up with demand for building projects. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Construction Industry Missing Key Tool: Skilled Workers

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Men sit by the side of the Panama Canal as a ship sails past in Gamboa near Panama City, last month. The expansion project is aimed at accommodating the world's largest container ships. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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A screengrab of a satellite image of Cordoba, Spain, in 2004 (left) and 2011. Satellite images via Google Earth and Nación Rotonda hide caption

toggle caption Satellite images via Google Earth and Nación Rotonda