Native Americans march to a sacred site on Sunday that they say was disturbed by bulldozers working on the Dakota Access Pipeline, near the encampment where hundreds of people have gathered to join the Standing Rock Sioux tribe's protest. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Following the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' recent approval of the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline, a coalition of environmental activists held a rally in New York City's Union Square Park to oppose the project. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Construction workers pour concrete at 1 a.m. in Chandler, Ariz. Sarah Ventre/KJZZ hide caption

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Sarah Ventre/KJZZ

When The Going Gets Hot, Construction Workers Get Nocturnal

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A worker in Claysville, Pa., shovels the fine powder that's part of a watery mixture used in hydraulic fracturing. Silica dust is created in a wide variety of construction and manufacturing industries, too. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

Tighter, Controversial Silica Rules Aimed At Saving Workers' Lungs

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The $1 billion Brickell City Centre, currently under construction, will house condos, a hotel and a retail and entertainment complex. Condo projects are booming in Miami, financed mostly by foreign buyers. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Foreign Dollars Fuel A New Condo Boom In Miami

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After laying off roughly 2 million workers during the recession, the construction industry may not have enough crews to keep up with demand for building projects. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Construction Industry Missing Key Tool: Skilled Workers

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Men sit by the side of the Panama Canal as a ship sails past in Gamboa near Panama City, last month. The expansion project is aimed at accommodating the world's largest container ships. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Arnulfo Franco/AP

A screengrab of a satellite image of Cordoba, Spain, in 2004 (left) and 2011. Satellite images via Google Earth and Nación Rotonda hide caption

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Satellite images via Google Earth and Nación Rotonda