Scientists have the ability to use DNA from three adults to make one embryo. But should they? A. Dudzinski/Science Source hide caption

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A. Dudzinski/Science Source

Babies With Genes From 3 People Could Be Ethical, Panel Says

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More African-Americans Are Learning Their Roots With Genetic Testing

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Chris Nickels for NPR

Powerful 'Gene Drive' Can Quickly Change An Entire Species

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Chromosomes and double helix over silhouettes of man Lee Woodgate/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Lee Woodgate/Ikon Images/Getty Images

'Great Pause' Among Prosecutors As DNA Proves Fallible

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The model of a DNA stands on a desk during a press conference to announce the winners of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015 on Wednesday at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm. Sweden's Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich of the US and Turkish-American Aziz Sancar won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for work on how cells repair damaged DNA. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

Mammoths had a distinctive version of a gene known to play a role in sensing outside temperature, moderating the biology of fat and regulating hair growth. That bit of DNA likely helped mammoths thrive in cold weather, scientists say. Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University hide caption

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Courtesy of Giant Screen Films, 2012 D3D Ice Age, LLC/Penn State University

Checking DNA Against Elephants Hints At How Mammoths Got Woolly

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A woolly mammoth skeleton gets auctioned off in Billingshurst, England. Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

If Science Could 'Clone A Mammoth,' Could It Save An Elephant?

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Cambrian Genomics says that what it calls a DNA printer is essentially a DNA sorter — it quickly spots and collects the desired, tailored stretch of DNA. Courtesy of Cambrian Genomics hide caption

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Courtesy of Cambrian Genomics

DNA 'Printing' A Big Boon To Research, But Some Raise Concerns

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Critics Lash Out At Chinese Scientists Who Edited DNA In Human Embryos

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Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Combining The DNA Of Three People Raises Ethical Questions

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Lori Baker with her husband, Erich. Baker is founder and executive director of the International Consortium for Forensic Identification, Reuniting Families Project. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Scientist IDs Bodies Of Migrants, Helping Families Find Closure

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Wade Goodwyn's dogs, Miles and Rosie, greeted James Lee Woodard eagerly. Wade Goodwyn/NPR hide caption

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Wade Goodwyn/NPR

After Exoneration, Small Moments Take On New Meaning

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Doctors used a rapid DNA test to identify a Wisconsin teen's unusual infection with Leptospira bacteria (yellow), which are common in the tropics. CDC/Rob Weyant hide caption

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CDC/Rob Weyant

Quick DNA Tests Crack Medical Mysteries Otherwise Missed

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Being able to insert the two man-made letters into DNA, alongside the usual four-letter alphabet, could teach old cells new tricks and lead to better drugs, researchers say. courtesy of Synthorx hide caption

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courtesy of Synthorx

Chemists Expand Nature's Genetic Alphabet

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An artist's illustration shows lung cancer cells lurking among healthy air sacs. David Mack/Science Source hide caption

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David Mack/Science Source

Simple Blood Test To Spot Early Lung Cancer Getting Closer

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