Up till now, all babies have had two genetic parents. That could soon change. Klöpper & Eisenschmidt GbR/iStockphoto hide caption

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Love your hair. Artists' depictions of a Neanderthal man and woman at the Neanderthal Museum in Mettmann, Germany. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Martin Meissner/AP

A Thai medic checks bodies for forensic identity in Phang Nga province in southern of Thailand on Jan. 11, 2005. Thousands of people were killed in Thailand after a massive tsunami struck on Dec. 26, 2004. Pornchai Kittiwongsakul/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A technician loads patient samples into a machine for testing at Myriad Genetics in Salt Lake City in 2002. The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Myriad cannot patent the BRCA genes, which are tested to check a woman's risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Douglas C. Pizac/AP hide caption

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Gov. Phil Bryant, at the Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Summit in Jackson, Miss., in 2012, supports a controversial effort to identify men who impregnate teen girls. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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A micrograph of HeLa cells, derived from cervical cancer cells taken from Henrietta Lacks. Tomasz Szul/Visuals Unlimited, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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When researchers looked at the genetic sequences of 179 individuals, they found far more defects in the patterns of As, Ts, Gs, and Cs than they expected. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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By sequencing a newborn's genome, doctors could screen for more genetic conditions. But parents could be confronted with confusing or ambiguous data about their baby's health. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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An image of researchers at Oregon Health & Science University removing the nucleus from the mother's cell before it's inserted into the donor's egg cell. Courtesty of Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Cheryl Gleasner, a research technologist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, works with a genome sequencing machine designed for disease surveillance. Since the SARS epidemic in 2003, advances in sequencing technologies have greatly speed up the ability to detect and track a new virus. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Slides containing DNA sit in a bay waiting to be analyzed by a genome sequencing machine. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Human chromosomes like these contain genes and lots of other genetic material whose function has been a mystery. National Cancer Institute via AP hide caption

itoggle caption National Cancer Institute via AP

Submitting a DNA sample to networking company 23andMe entails spitting a saliva sample into a plastic vial. 23andMe hide caption

itoggle caption 23andMe

Cornelius Dupree Jr., center, raises his hands in celebration with his lawyer Nina Morrison, left, and attorney Barry Scheck in Dallas on Tuesday, Jan. 4, 2011. (Correction at 8:30 a.m. ET, Jan. 5: Earlier, we mistakenly said the photograph was taken in 2010.) Mike Fuentes/AP hide caption

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