Colored scanning electron micrograph of baker's yeast, conventionally grown in the lab. So far, researchers have been able to synthesize six of the yeast's 16 chromosomes from scratch, and think they may be able to complete all 16 by 2018. Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Source hide caption

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Dennis Kunkel Microscopy/Science Source

Scientists Closer To Creating A Fully Synthetic Yeast Genome

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Passengers leave the departure hall Thursday at Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Malaysia where Kim Jong Nam was reportedly attacked and killed three days before. Margie Mason/AP hide caption

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Margie Mason/AP

Biologist Shaun Clements counts down the seconds before emptying a vial of synthetic DNA into a stream near Alsea, Oregon. Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix hide caption

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Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute excavate the East Gallery of Denisova Cave in Siberia in August 2010. With ancient bone fragments so hard to come by, being able to successfully filter dirt for the DNA of extinct human ancestors can open new doors, research-wise. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

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Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Dust To Dust: Scientists Find DNA Of Human Ancestors In Cave Floor Dirt

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Samples from this 17th century Lithuanian mummy were found to house samples of variola, the virus that causes smallpox. Kiril Cachovski/Lithuanian Mummy Project hide caption

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Kiril Cachovski/Lithuanian Mummy Project

A Mummy's DNA May Help Solve The Mystery Of The Origins Of Smallpox

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Virginijus Siksnys' large research team at the Vilnius University Institute of Biotechnology in Lithuania. Arunas Silanskas/Vilnius University Institute of Biotechnology hide caption

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Arunas Silanskas/Vilnius University Institute of Biotechnology

Science Rewards Eureka Moments, Except When It Doesn't

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Burmese python and the DNA sequence responsible for limb loss. Eric Zamora/Florida Museum of Natural History and Martin J. Cohn/University of Florida hide caption

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Eric Zamora/Florida Museum of Natural History and Martin J. Cohn/University of Florida
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New York Fertility Doctor Says He Created Baby With 3 Genetic Parents

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Scientists have the ability to use DNA from three adults to make one embryo. But should they? A. Dudzinski/Science Source hide caption

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A. Dudzinski/Science Source

Babies With Genes From 3 People Could Be Ethical, Panel Says

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More African-Americans Are Learning Their Roots With Genetic Testing

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