An artist's impression of the superluminous supernova as it would appear from a planet in the same galaxy, about 10,000 light-years away. The exploding star is 570 billion times brighter than our sun. Jin Ma/Beijing Planetarium/Science hide caption

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Jin Ma/Beijing Planetarium/Science

Record-Busting Star Explosion Baffles Sky Watchers

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A blast from the past: Using data from four telescopes, NASA created this image of the first documented sighting of a supernova, made by Chinese astronomers in 185 A.D. NASA/JPL-Caltech/B. Williams hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/B. Williams

To Search For A New Supernova, Build A New Camera

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This artist's illustration shows what NuSTAR should look like in orbit after its 30-foot-long mast deployed. JPL-Caltech/NASA hide caption

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JPL-Caltech/NASA