United States players celebrate a goal against Guatemala during the second half of a World Cup qualifying soccer match Tuesday in Columbus, Ohio. The United States beat Guatemala 4-0. Jay LaPrete/AP hide caption

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Art imitates life in this 2015 addition to London's Madame Tussauds: a wax figure of Kim Kardashian, taking a selfie — naturally. Tabatha Fireman/Getty Images hide caption

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Selfies In 2015: A Woman Thing?
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A fan crowd-surfs at the 2014 Wacken Open Air heavy metal music festival in Germany. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Manliness In Music: The XY Hits The Hi-Fi
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Mike Buchanan gives his presentation, "Let's Get Political," at the International Conference on Men's Issues, held in June near Detroit. Buchanan founded a political party in the U.K., Justice for Men & Boys, in 2013. Fabrizio Costantini/Getty Images hide caption

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For Men's Rights Groups, Feminism Has Come At The Expense Of Men
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Kumar Chandran and Elanor Starmer with their son, Kailas Chandran. The couple's friends are envious of Chandran's paid paternity leave. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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More Dads Want Paternity Leave. Getting It Is A Different Matter
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It was a great time to be an American man in the workplace after World War II. Hiring was strong for both white-collar jobs and factory work while industries like autos, aviation and steel were booming. By the 1960s, that started to change. Three Lions/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Are Men Leaving The American Workforce?
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