Susan Glisson, former director of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation at the University of Mississippi, facilitates discussions on slavery and race. Charles Tucker/Sustainable Equity hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Tucker/Sustainable Equity

'Only Cheap Talk Is Cheap': Mississippi Woman Hosts Conversations About Race

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494127926/494127927" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Derrick Johnson, president of the Mississippi NAACP, said at a press conference Wednesday that Donald Trump "clings to the hateful and intolerant rhetoric of this country's shameful history — a history that we know all too well." Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah McCammon/NPR

For Many Black Voters, Trump's 'What Do You Have To Lose?' Plea Isn't Enough

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/491243776/491246799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Protesters march on May 1, seeking repeal of a Mississippi law allowing religious groups and some private businesses to deny services to same-sex couples, transgender people and others. A federal judge ruled the law unconstitutional late Thursday. Jeff Amy/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jeff Amy/AP

In this picture released by the FBI and the State of Mississippi Attorney General's Office, the burned-out station wagon that slain civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner were driving in is seen in June 1964 in the Bogue Chitto swamp, some 13 miles northeast of Philadelphia, Miss. FBI/State of Mississippi Attorney General's Office/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
FBI/State of Mississippi Attorney General's Office/Getty Images

A crowd of around 500 protest against House Bill 1523 outside the governor's office during a rally by the Human Rights Campaign on Monday in Jackson, Miss. James Patterson/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign hide caption

toggle caption
James Patterson/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign

Protesters call for Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant to veto House Bill 1523 during a rally outside the Governor's Mansion in Jackson, Miss., Monday. The governor signed the controversial bill into law on Tuesday. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rogelio V. Solis/AP

The Rev. Chris Donald, a Methodist chaplain at Millsaps College, joins other human rights advocates Wednesday at the state Capitol's rotunda, calling for the Mississippi Senate to defeat what they believe is a discriminatory anti-LGBT bill. The Senate passed the bill, which is now on the governor's desk. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Four couples have won their challenge of Mississippi's ban on same-sex adoption. Two of the plaintiffs, Susan Hrostowski (left) and Kathryn Garner, are seen here last summer with their teenage son, Hudson Garner. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Rogelio V. Solis/AP

The courtroom in Sumner, Miss., where, in 1955, an all-white jury acquitted two white men in the murder of Emmett Till, a 14-year old black boy. Langdon Clay hide caption

toggle caption
Langdon Clay

6 Decades Later, Acquittal Of Emmett Till's Killers Troubles Town

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/443205842/443334582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Palm trees bend and banners rip on Canal Street as Hurricane Katrina blows through New Orleans on Aug. 29, 2005 — 10 years ago Saturday. Ted Jackson/The Times-Picayune/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Ted Jackson/The Times-Picayune/Landov

3 Views On A Tragedy: Reporters Recall First Days After Katrina

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/435623921/435853690" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President George W. Bush (center) surveys the devastation in New Orleans with (from left to right) Vice Adm. Thad Allen, Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco, Mayor Ray Nagin and Lt. Gen. Russel Honore on Sept. 12, 2005, two weeks after Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

"Brownie, you're doing a heck of a job ..."

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/434385285/434581974" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Mississippi resident Ethel Curry stands in front of her East Biloxi home, which was rebuilt with the help of volunteers after Hurricane Katrina. Evelina Burnett/MPB hide caption

toggle caption
Evelina Burnett/MPB

Scars Of Katrina Slow To Heal For Mississippi Gulf Coast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/431931904/433735948" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript