Mississippi Mississippi

A statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee, as it was removed from its longtime resting place in New Orleans on Friday. Lee's statue was the last of four Confederate monuments to be removed under a 2015 City Council vote. Scott Threlkeld/AP hide caption

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Scott Threlkeld/AP

Joshua Vallum is sworn in before pleading guilty to state murder charges at George County Circuit Court in Lucedale, Miss., last July. On Monday, he was sentenced to 49 years in prison for a federal hate crime — the first such case brought for a crime specifically targeting a victim because of their gender identity. Biloxi Sun Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Biloxi Sun Herald/TNS via Getty Images

1st Man Prosecuted For Federal Hate Crime Targeting Transgender Victim Gets 49 Years

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Kris Ingram, a DJ hired to perform at a prom at The Rustic Barn, looks through debris for his equipment after the event venue in Canton, Texas, sustained major tornado damage on Sunday. Brandon Wade/Reuters hide caption

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Brandon Wade/Reuters

The state flag of Mississippi, which incorporates the Confederate battle flag in the top left corner, is displayed with the flags of the other states and territories in the tunnel connecting the Senate office building and the U.S. Capitol in 2015. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Veteran Mississippi journalist Bill Minor (seated) points out a ceiling inscription to state Sen. David Jordan, D-Greenwood, at the lectern) in Mississippi Senate chambers in 2015. Minor, who died on Tuesday, was being honored in the 2015 ceremony with a Senate concurrent resolution citing his impact on the state's culture. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Emergency crews work on the scene where a train hit a charter bus in Biloxi, Miss., Tuesday. The National Transportation Safety Board says the freight train was traveling about 19 mph at the time of the crash. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Burned pews, musical instruments, Bibles and hymnals are part of the debris inside Hopewell M.B. Church in Greenville, Miss., shown Wednesday. The mayor is calling it a hate crime as arson investigators collect evidence at the black church, which was heavily damaged by fire and tagged with "Vote Trump" in silver spray paint. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

Susan Glisson, former director of the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation at the University of Mississippi, facilitates discussions on slavery and race. Charles Tucker/Sustainable Equity hide caption

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Charles Tucker/Sustainable Equity

'Only Cheap Talk Is Cheap': Mississippi Woman Hosts Conversations About Race

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Derrick Johnson, president of the Mississippi NAACP, said at a press conference Wednesday that Donald Trump "clings to the hateful and intolerant rhetoric of this country's shameful history — a history that we know all too well." Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

For Many Black Voters, Trump's 'What Do You Have To Lose?' Plea Isn't Enough

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Protesters march on May 1, seeking repeal of a Mississippi law allowing religious groups and some private businesses to deny services to same-sex couples, transgender people and others. A federal judge ruled the law unconstitutional late Thursday. Jeff Amy/AP hide caption

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Jeff Amy/AP

In this picture released by the FBI and the State of Mississippi Attorney General's Office, the burned-out station wagon that slain civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner were driving in is seen in June 1964 in the Bogue Chitto swamp, some 13 miles northeast of Philadelphia, Miss. FBI/State of Mississippi Attorney General's Office/Getty Images hide caption

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FBI/State of Mississippi Attorney General's Office/Getty Images