There are many reasons someone could end up having a lapse in health insurance. They might need to move closer to a caregiver or treatment center, for example, and consequently have to quit their job — and lose their insurance. Portra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Portra Images/Getty Images

People attending Rep. Rod Blum's town hall event in Dubuque, Iowa, this week held up red sheets of paper to show disagreement with what the Republican congressman was saying and green to show they concurred. The GOP health care bill was a major concern of many. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Fact-Checking Republicans' Defense Of The GOP Health Bill

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House Speaker Paul Ryan (center) walks to the House chamber ahead of a budget vote on Capitol Hill. Though Ryan was able to deliver 217 votes Thursday to get his GOP health plan through the House, there are still significant hurdles before the bill becomes law. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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5 Things To Watch As GOP Health Bill Moves To The Senate

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Rep. Peter King, a Republican representing Long Island, has been heavily lobbied by groups on both sides of the GOP health care bill who are intent on getting him to vote their way. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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People who lacked health insurance for more than three consecutive months in 2016, or who bought individual insurance and got federal help paying the premiums, will need to do a little work to figure out what, if anything, they owe the IRS. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

Tax Day And Health Insurance Under Trump

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The Trump administration is proposing changes to Obamacare that the White House says should stabilize the insurance marketplace. But critics of the proposal see big bumps ahead for consumers. Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Waters/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Though they failed to mobilize Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act last month, Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) (right), Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and the White House could still undercut the insurance exchanges, reduce Medicaid benefits and let states limit coverage of birth control or prenatal visits. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says the proposed Republican health bill would lead to an enormous transfer of wealth from poorer Americans to richer ones. Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

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Marian Carrasquero/NPR

Pelosi Says Democrats Have A Responsibility To Look For Common Ground On Health Law

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Ford, now 33, was diagnosed with young-onset Parkinson's disease three years ago. He and Cortney savor his relatively good health now. But the disease is degenerative, which means they'll likely need an individual health policy one day soon, and will eventually turn to Medicaid. Alex Smith/KCUR hide caption

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Alex Smith/KCUR

A Young Man With Parkinson's Worries About The Costs Of A GOP Health Plan

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Rep. Frank Pallone still hasn't been given a chance to see the Republicans' bill that would replace the ACA. "I think they're afraid," the Democrat from New Jersey said of his Republican colleagues. "I think they're afraid that it will show that it really doesn't cover most of the people that receive coverage under the Affordable Care Act." Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Advocates of paying a family doctor a flat monthly fee for office visits and some lab work say it saves patients money when coupled with a high-deductible insurance plan. Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Ridofranz/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Seema Verma, who is President Trump's nominee to head the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, has said that maternity benefits should be optional. Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Craig Britton once paid $18,000 a year in premiums for health insurance he bought through Minnesota's "high risk pool." He calls the argument that these pools can bring down the cost of monthly premiums "a lot of baloney." Mark Zdehchlik / MPR News hide caption

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Mark Zdehchlik / MPR News

Drowning In A 'High-Risk' Insurance Pool, At $18,000 A Year

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