Workers at the Department of Homeland Security's National Operations Center in 2015. The Obama administration proposes $3.1 billion in upgrades to federal computer systems. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
Annelise Capossela

Human Or Machine: Can You Tell Who Wrote These Poems?

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This 2005 silicon wafer with Pentium 4 processors was signed by Gordon Moore for the 40th anniversary of Moore’'s law. Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

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Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Dave Rauchwerk is CEO of Next Thing Co., which makes the CHIP computer. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

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Laura Sydell/NPR

Can A $9 Computer Spark A New Wave Of Tinkering And Innovation?

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Ramalinga Raju, founder and former chairman of fraud-hit Satyam Computer Services, is escorted from a court in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad in April 2009. Raju and nine other defendants have been convicted of fraud and conspiracy. Krishnendu Halder/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Krishnendu Halder/Reuters/Landov
Daniel Horowitz for NPR

Can A Computer Change The Essence Of Who You Are?

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Dealer Omar Abu-Eid adjusts a stack of chips before the first day of the World Series of Poker's main event in Las Vegas last July. Humans still reign in most versions of poker. Whew. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

Look Out, This Poker-Playing Computer Is Unbeatable

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British science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke using a Kaypro II in 1985. AP/Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United Artists hide caption

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AP/Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United Artists

The Kaypro II: An Early Computer With A Writer's Heart

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