computers computers

After collecting and refurbishing IBM's Model F keyboards for years, Joe Strandberg decided he wanted to start manufacturing them. Courtesy of Joe Strandberg hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Joe Strandberg

This 10-Pound Keyboard From The 1980s Is Making A Comeback

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/537290841/537291355" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"I lost the first good novel I ever wrote to a computer disaster. It happened at a crucial time in my life, when I was still figuring out if I could even do this thing — become a writer." Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

toggle caption
Katie Edwards/Getty Images/Ikon Images

A Novelist Forces Himself To Press On After Losing 100 Pages In A Tech Glitch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534865245/536682009" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Cash machines in a supermarket in Kiev weren't working on Wednesday after a cyberattack paralyzed computers in Ukraine and elsewhere. Victims included government offices, energy companies, banks and gas stations. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Workers at the Department of Homeland Security's National Operations Center in 2015. The Obama administration proposes $3.1 billion in upgrades to federal computer systems. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
Annelise Capossela

Human Or Machine: Can You Tell Who Wrote These Poems?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/480639265/483749594" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This 2005 silicon wafer with Pentium 4 processors was signed by Gordon Moore for the 40th anniversary of Moore’'s law. Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Science & Society Picture Library/Getty Images

Dave Rauchwerk is CEO of Next Thing Co., which makes the CHIP computer. Laura Sydell/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Laura Sydell/NPR

Can A $9 Computer Spark A New Wave Of Tinkering And Innovation?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463592334/463789773" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ramalinga Raju, founder and former chairman of fraud-hit Satyam Computer Services, is escorted from a court in the southern Indian city of Hyderabad in April 2009. Raju and nine other defendants have been convicted of fraud and conspiracy. Krishnendu Halder/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Krishnendu Halder/Reuters/Landov