gun control gun control

Colin Goddard was shot four times, but says he received an outpouring of support as he recovered. He worries about others who didn't get the same kind of support. Courtesy of Colin Goddard hide caption

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Courtesy of Colin Goddard

The Uninjured Victims Of The Virginia Tech Shootings

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Workers with the Living United for Change in Arizona organization canvas a south Phoenix neighborhood in October to advocate for the passage of Proposition 206, which would increase the state's minimum wage. The measure was approved on Tuesday. Astrid Galvan/AP hide caption

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Astrid Galvan/AP

A new ballot measure in Washington will determine if courts can take away guns from people deemed to be dangerous to themselves or others. The initiative is well-funded and comes two years after the state passed a different initiative for background checks on gun sales, including those that are private. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Gun Control Groups Aim Their Money At States — And The Ballot

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A box of 500 .22 cal. bullets are offered for sale at an Illinois gun store in 2012. California voters are voting on a measure that would require ammunition buyers to face the same background checks gun buyers in the state do. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Should Ammunition Buyers Face Background Checks? California's Voters Will Decide

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Members of the Secret Service stand guard near Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in August as she speaks at a rally at International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 357 Hall in Las Vegas. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Protesters call for House Speaker Paul Ryan to allow votes on gun violence prevention legislation in Washington, D.C., on July 6. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

After Mass Shootings, Action On Gun Legislation Soars At State Level

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Gov. Jerry Brown signed six new bills into law Friday, nearly seven months after a mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif. Two of the new laws restrict ammunition. In this photo from last summer, a man enters a gun store in Los Angeles. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

The trade in alcohol — illegal under Prohibition — led to the rise of organized crime and men such as Chicago gangster Al Capone, photographed here on Jan. 19, 1931. AP hide caption

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AP

Prohibition-Era Gang Violence Spurred Congress To Pass First Gun Law

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A marksman sights in on a target during a class for an Illinois concealed carry permit in February 2014. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Handguns In America And The Rise Of The 'Concealed-Carry Lifestyle'

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Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., leads lawmakers down the steps of the Capitol to greet a crowd assembled after House Democrats ended their 26-hour-long sit-in protest on Thursday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

This photo provided by Rep. John Yarmuth, D-Ky., shows Democrat members of Congress, including Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., (center) and Rep. Joe Courtney, D-Conn., (left) participating in a sit-down protest seeking a vote on gun control measures, Wednesday on the House floor. Rep. John Yarmuth/AP hide caption

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Rep. John Yarmuth/AP

Everytown for Gun Safety teaches survivors of shootings how to use their stories to advocate for gun control legislation. Ruby Wallau/NPR hide caption

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Ruby Wallau/NPR

A Million-Mom Army And A Billionaire Take On The NRA

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