Tunisians celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Arab Spring on Thursday in Tunis. Riadh Dridi/AP hide caption

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5 Years After Ousting Dictator, Is Tunisia Backsliding On Human Rights?

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Police officers take positions as they arrive at scene of a bus explosion in the center of Tunis, the capital city of Tunisia, Tuesday. Hassene Dridi/AP hide caption

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December 2013: A Tunisian boy waves a flag as he runs at a rally in Tunis, marking the third anniversary of Tunisia's revolution. A prominent member of the group that's credited with averting civil war in the country says the group acted "to give hope to young people." Zoubeir Souissi /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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How Tunisia's 'Quartet' Saved A Country From Civil War And Won The Nobel Peace Prize

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Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet, represented here at a news conference in 2013, won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for the group's contribution to building democracy after the Jasmine Revolution in 2011. Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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In Kairouan, Tunisia, Muslims visit the Great Mosque, one of the oldest and best-known mosques in North Africa. Tunisia has made more political progress than other Arab Spring countries, but it has suffered two major terror attacks in recent months. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Tunisia Seeks Its Way On A Winding, Bumpy Path

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Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi speaks during a forum on strategic planning, in Tunis, in June. Essebsi has declared a state of emergency his office says is aimed at dealing with the threat of Islamist extremists. Mohamed Messara/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Police patrol the beach at Sousse, Tunisia, on Sunday. Tunisian authorities have deployed additional security forces, closed some mosques and banned some Islamist groups in the wake of Friday's terrorist attack at a beachfront hotel. Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP hide caption

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After Slaughter Of Tourists, Tunisia Cracks Down On Islamists

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The body of a tourist lies near a beachside hotel in Sousse, Tunisia. Dozens of people were killed Friday when at least one gunman opened fire at the hotel, an interior ministry spokesman said. Amine Ben Aziza/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Survivors are escorted from the National Bardo Museum in Tunis on Wednesday. At least 20 foreign tourists were killed in the attack. Mohamed Krit/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Tunisian Museum Attack: 'I Thought It Was A Game,' Witness Says

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Tunisian voter Dina Ghlisse, 19, displays her finger with the indelible ink mark after voting in La Marsa, on the outskirts of Tunis, on Sunday. More than three years after Tunisia sparked the Arab Spring, the country is choosing a president. Hassene Dridi/AP hide caption

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A woman votes in the first round of the Tunisian presidential election on Nov. 23. The election went smoothly, but no candidate won 50 percent of a vote, forcing a runoff between the top two on Sunday. Hassene Dridi/AP hide caption

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With A Presidential Vote, Tunisia Seeks A Peaceful Transition

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Cooperative captives conduct afternoon prayers inside a communal cellblock at Camp 6 last month at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Six long-time detainees of the prison have been transferred to Uruguay. Walter Michot/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Star Wars Fans Force Sands Back From Darth Vader's Tunisia Birthplace

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Tunisian citizens take a selfie with their inked fingers after casting their votes at a polling station during the Tunisian Presidential Election on Sunday. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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A voter raises her ink-stained finger after voting in Tunis Sunday. Tunisians voted in parliamentary elections that bring full democracy finally within their reach, in the cradle of the Arab Spring. Zoubeir Souissi/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Ramzi El-Fekih, CEO of Creova, stands in his server room in Tunis. He has built a mobile payments company, but because of banking restrictions, Tunisians can use his product only for domestic purchases. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Tunisia's Emerging Tech Sector Hampered By Old Policies

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Supporters of Tunisia's secular Popular Front on Tuesday celebrate the third anniversary of the ouster of dictator Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. The country is on the verge of approving a new constitution that was negotiated by Islamist and secular political parties. Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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