Supporters of Tunisia's secular Popular Front on Tuesday celebrate the third anniversary of the ouster of dictator Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. The country is on the verge of approving a new constitution that was negotiated by Islamist and secular political parties. Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov

Tunisians wave their national flag and shout slogans on Tuesday in the capital, Tunis, as they attend a rally marking the third anniversary of the uprising that ousted longtime dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images

Is This Arab Spring Country Finally Getting It Right?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/262357235/262357236" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tunisia's Prime Minister-designate, Ali Larayedh, speaks during a Feb. 26 press conference. His priorities will include forming a stable government and overseeing the writing of a new constitution. Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Fethi Belaid/AFP/Getty Images

A protester, and riot police in the background, during the clashes Friday in Tunis. Louafi Larbi /Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption Louafi Larbi /Reuters /Landov

Eleanor Beardsley reporting from Tunis

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/171475856/171475943" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A car burns during clashes between demonstrators and secuitry forces on Friday in Sidi Bouzid.

Mokhtar Kahouli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Mokhtar Kahouli/AFP/Getty Images

In Tunisia: 'We Have No Idea' If Secular Or Islamist Views Will Prevail

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135212298/135216815" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

"We have an enormous stake in ensuring that Egypt and Tunisia provide models for the kind of democracy that we want to see," Secretary of State Hillary Clinton told a congressional panel. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

toggle caption Jose Luis Magana/AP