Forensic police investigate a truck at the scene of a terror attack on the Promenade des Anglais on Thursday evening in Nice, France. A French-Tunisian attacker killed 84 people as he drove a truck through crowds gathered to watch a fireworks display during Bastille Day celebrations. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

Tunisian Olfa Hamrouni points at pictures of her daughters Rahma (above) and Ghofran. The teenage girls were exploited by extremist recruits and left their homeland to join ISIS in neighboring Libya. Leila Fadel/NPR hide caption

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Leila Fadel/NPR

She's Lost 2 Daughters To ISIS; Will Her Younger Girls Be Next?

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Tunisian soldiers patrol the outskirts of Ben Guerdane, in southern Tunisia, on March 8. Islamic State extremists crossed over from nearby Libya on March 7. They were beaten back, but the episode raised concerns that Libya's chaos could spread to Tunisia. AP hide caption

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AP

Tunisia's Fragile Democracy Faces A Threat From Chaotic Libya

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Tunisians celebrate the fifth anniversary of the Arab Spring on Thursday in Tunis. Riadh Dridi/AP hide caption

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Riadh Dridi/AP

5 Years After Ousting Dictator, Is Tunisia Backsliding On Human Rights?

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Police officers take positions as they arrive at scene of a bus explosion in the center of Tunis, the capital city of Tunisia, Tuesday. Hassene Dridi/AP hide caption

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Hassene Dridi/AP

December 2013: A Tunisian boy waves a flag as he runs at a rally in Tunis, marking the third anniversary of Tunisia's revolution. A prominent member of the group that's credited with averting civil war in the country says the group acted "to give hope to young people." Zoubeir Souissi /Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Zoubeir Souissi /Reuters /Landov

How Tunisia's 'Quartet' Saved A Country From Civil War And Won The Nobel Peace Prize

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Tunisia's National Dialogue Quartet, represented here at a news conference in 2013, won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for the group's contribution to building democracy after the Jasmine Revolution in 2011. Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Anis Mili/Reuters /Landov

In Kairouan, Tunisia, Muslims visit the Great Mosque, one of the oldest and best-known mosques in North Africa. Tunisia has made more political progress than other Arab Spring countries, but it has suffered two major terror attacks in recent months. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Tunisia Seeks Its Way On A Winding, Bumpy Path

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Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi speaks during a forum on strategic planning, in Tunis, in June. Essebsi has declared a state of emergency his office says is aimed at dealing with the threat of Islamist extremists. Mohamed Messara/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Mohamed Messara/EPA/Landov

Police patrol the beach at Sousse, Tunisia, on Sunday. Tunisian authorities have deployed additional security forces, closed some mosques and banned some Islamist groups in the wake of Friday's terrorist attack at a beachfront hotel. Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP hide caption

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Abdeljalil Bounhar/AP

After Slaughter Of Tourists, Tunisia Cracks Down On Islamists

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The body of a tourist lies near a beachside hotel in Sousse, Tunisia. Dozens of people were killed Friday when at least one gunman opened fire at the hotel, an interior ministry spokesman said. Amine Ben Aziza/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Amine Ben Aziza/Reuters/Landov

Survivors are escorted from the National Bardo Museum in Tunis on Wednesday. At least 20 foreign tourists were killed in the attack. Mohamed Krit/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Mohamed Krit/Barcroft Media/Landov

Tunisian Museum Attack: 'I Thought It Was A Game,' Witness Says

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