corruption corruption

Javier Duarte, the former governor of the Mexican state of Veracruz, sits handcuffed following his arrest in Panajache, Guatemala, on Saturday. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roman Nasirov (left, in orange), the suspended head of Ukraine's tax service, lies inside the defendant's cage during his court hearing in Kiev on March 5. He was first detained in a hospital, claiming illness. Nasirov is accused in an embezzlement scheme amounting to more than $70 million. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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In Ukraine, Some Signs Of Progress In Uphill Battle Against Corruption

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President Donald Trump signs a bill repealing a rule passed last July that required oil, gas and mining companies to disclose payments to overseas governments. The rule was meant to promote transparency. Critics of the repeal argue it served as an important national security tool since corruption often leads to violence, instability and terrorism. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Repeal Of Anti-Corruption Rule May Hurt National Security, Critics Warn

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International Monetary Fund Managing Director Christine Lagarde (from left), Jose Ugaz of Transparency International, Daria Kaleniuk of the Anti-Corruption Action Center, and Norway's Prime Minister Erna Solberg participate in a panel discussion at the Anti-Corruption Summit in London in May 2016. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

Trump's Conflicts Could Undercut Global Efforts To Fight Corruption, Critics Say

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Phoolan Devi, popularly known as the "Bandit Queen," received garlands in New Delhi in 1996 after she was elected to parliament. She spent 11 years in jail on charges of murder and banditry, and was released in 1994. She was assassinated in 2001. John Moore/Associated Press hide caption

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John Moore/Associated Press

In a live TV program, John Macharia tells the Kenyan president that traffic police in Nairobi expect bribes from matatu drivers. iNooroTV/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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iNooroTV/Screenshot by NPR

Kenyan Bus Driver Speaks Out Against Everyday Corruption On Live TV

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The Trump International Golf Club in Dubai is part of the president-elect's real estate empire. Trump has said his sons would run his companies while he's president. Karim Sahib/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For Global Investors, 'Uncertainty' Over Business Climate Under Trump

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Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi leaves a Catholic hospice in Cesano Boscone on May 9, 2014, after serving his first day of community service for tax fraud. Giuseppe Cacace/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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When It Comes To Wealthy Leaders, World Abounds With Cautionary Tales

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Former Secretary of the Central Secretariat of the Communist Party of China Ling Jihua, seen here in 2013, was found guilty of accepting bribes and allowing his wife and son to benefit from corruption. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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A stately Georgian house at 29 Harley Street is home to Formations House, a company that specializes in creating other companies. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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1 Address, 2,000 Companies, And The Ease Of Doing Business In The U.K.

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Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) toasts with Britain's Queen Elizabeth II during a state banquet at Buckingham Palace in London on the first day of the state visit in October 2015. Elizabeth said on camera that Chinese officials had been "very rude" during the official visit. Dominic Lipinski/AP hide caption

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Dominic Lipinski/AP

The Almudaina Palace (left) is one of two royal palaces on Spain's Mallorca island. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Spain's Playground For The Wealthy Becomes Corruption Scandal Epicenter

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