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Dr. Kurt Newman visits with 14-year-old Jack Pessaud, who's undergoing treatment for a cancerous tumor in his knee at Children's National Health System in Washington, D.C. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

'Healing Children': A Surgeon's Take On What Kids Need

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People gather at the site of a suicide bomb attack at a market in June 2015 in Maiduguri, Nigeria, where two girls blew themselves up near a crowded mosque. Jossy Ola/AP hide caption

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Jossy Ola/AP

Social media postings showing parents "disciplining" their children, including (from left) LaToya Graham, ReShonda Tate Billingsley and Tavis Sellers, went viral. ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR

A child holds an umbrella as refugees at a refugee camp in Palorinya, Uganda. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

14-Year-Old Who Fled South Sudan: 'They're Killing Women, Children'

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Children on the side of a road in Solo in Indonesia's Central Java province ask passing bus drivers to honk their horns on Friday. Videos of children with signs like these have recently gone viral. AP hide caption

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AP

Babu, 8, works at a brick factory in Narayanganj, Bangladesh. KM Asad/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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KM Asad/LightRocket via Getty Images

Study: Child Laborers In Bangladesh Are Working 64 Hours A Week

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Iraqi children follow instructions given by a teacher (center) during an outdoor class at the Hassan Sham camp on Nov. 10. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

ISIS Drove Them From School. Now The Kids Of Mosul Want To Go Back

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Born In The U.S., Raised In China: 'Satellite Babies' Have A Hard Time Coming Home

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Travis and Sadiye Rieder play with Sinem in their home. They've agreed that if they want more children, they'll adopt. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Should We Be Having Kids In The Age Of Climate Change?

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