The YouTube Star Who's Teaching Kids How To Bake

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Jack Gilbert, co-author of the book "Dirt Is Good," says kids should be encouraged to get dirty, play with animals and eat colorful vegetables. Elizabethsalleebauer/Getty Images/RooM RF hide caption

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Elizabethsalleebauer/Getty Images/RooM RF

'Dirt Is Good': Why Kids Need Exposure To Germs

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Dr. Kurt Newman visits with 14-year-old Jack Pessaud, who's undergoing treatment for a cancerous tumor in his knee at Children's National Health System in Washington, D.C. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

'Healing Children': A Surgeon's Take On What Kids Need

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People gather at the site of a suicide bomb attack at a market in June 2015 in Maiduguri, Nigeria, where two girls blew themselves up near a crowded mosque. Jossy Ola/AP hide caption

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Jossy Ola/AP

Social media postings showing parents "disciplining" their children, including (from left) LaToya Graham, ReShonda Tate Billingsley and Tavis Sellers, went viral. ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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ABC 2 News WMAR; ReShonda Tate Billingsley; Tavis Sellers/Screenshots by NPR

A child holds an umbrella as refugees at a refugee camp in Palorinya, Uganda. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

14-Year-Old Who Fled South Sudan: 'They're Killing Women, Children'

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Children on the side of a road in Solo in Indonesia's Central Java province ask passing bus drivers to honk their horns on Friday. Videos of children with signs like these have recently gone viral. AP hide caption

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AP