Alisha Lalani, 10, of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., looks at her phone as her mother and brother check in for their flight to Miami at Washington's Reagan National Airport. Their flight was one of thousands delayed as a result of a technical glitch with an FAA automated system. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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September 13, 2009 photo of Andreas Lubitz, who is believed to have deliberately crashed Germanwings Flight 9525 into a mountain in southern France on March 24, 2015, killing all 150 people on board. Getty Images/Getty Images hide caption

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A Southwest Airlines pilot and co-pilot preparing for a flight from Dallas last year. In the wake of the Germanwings crash this week, many European airlines are rushing to adopt a two-person cockpit rule similar to the one already in place in the U.S. LM Otero/AP hide caption

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Drones are displayed at an event with the Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) Coalition, last month. The FAA's proposed new rules for their commercial use require certified pilots to fly them and limit their speed, altitude and area of operation. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Travelers lined up Friday to reschedule flights at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport after the region's air traffic control was sabotaged. More flights are resuming Saturday, but hundreds were also canceled. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Where Can Drones Fly? Legal Limits Are Up In the Air

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The Air Force's U-2 spy plane first took flight in August 1955. One of the planes confused air traffic control computers in California last week, creating havoc. USAF/Getty Images hide caption

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A water-collecting drone hovers at a testing site in Lincoln, Neb., in 2013. The Federal Aviation Administration is working on rules for the commercial use of unmanned aircraft. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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FAA Head: Safety, Privacy Concerns Abound In Regulating Drones

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Pablo Lema shows off his quadcopter. Steve Henn/NPR hide caption

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Under The Radar: Some Pilots Of Small Drones Skirt FAA Rules

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