Cocoa pods in Ivory Coast, one of the world's top producers of cocoa. Climate models suggest that West Africa, where much of the world's cocoa is grown, will get drier, which could affect supply. Issouf Sanogo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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As Big Food Feels Threat Of Climate Change, Companies Speak Up

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Rows of potted cocoa plants from around the world. Before a cocoa variety from one country can be planted in another, it first makes a pit stop here, at a quarantine center in rural England. Courtesy of Dr. Andrew J. Daymond hide caption

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The Fate Of The World's Chocolate Depends On This Spot In Rural England

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Farmer Issiaka Ouedraogo lays cocoa beans out to dry on reed mats, on a farm outside the village of Fangolo, Ivory Coast. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Should You Stock Up On Chocolate Bars Because Of Ebola?

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Vincent Mourou, co-founder of Vietnam's first artisan chocolate maker Marou, inspects cacao beans at a farmer's garden in Go Cong Tay district. Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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