The walls inside Dog Mountain's chapel are filled with thousands of notes, cards and photos, all heartfelt tributes to pets loved and lost. Carlton SooHoo/Courtesy of Dan Collison hide caption

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At Vermont's Dog Mountain, Comfort And Community For Pet Lovers
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A direct, friendly gaze seems to help cement the bond of affection between people and their pooches. Dan Perez/Flickr hide caption

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Scientists Probe Puppy Love
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Amtrak conductor Michael Laubauskas talks on a radio Feb. 19 as his train departs Trenton, N.J., for Washington, D.C. The U.S. House passed an Amtrak funding bill Wednesday that splits Amtrak's high-ridership Northeast Corridor line that runs from Boston to Washington from the less profitable part of the system. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

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Laurie McCannon, director of the Northeast Animal Shelter in Salem, Mass., with a dog named Trina. Three-quarters of the dogs adopted from the shelter in 2013 were from out of state. Shannon Mullen for NPR hide caption

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With Rescue Dogs In Demand, More Shelters Look Far Afield For Fido
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Miami-Dade County's animal shelter takes in more than 28,000 dogs and cats each year. In 2012, the county adopted a resolution that the shelter would become a no-kill facility. But even no-kill shelters can euthanize up to 10 percent of their animals. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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No-Kill Shelters Save Millions Of Unwanted Pets — But Not All Of Them
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Do you want to go to the park? Mango Doucleff, of San Francisco, responds to her favorite command by perking up her ears and tilting her head. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

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How Dogs Understand What We Say
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A puppy waits at an adoption event in Miami last year. The city is now considering a ban on the sale of puppies in retail pet stores. Cities and towns in several states have passed similar bans, aimed at cracking down on substandard, large-scale puppy breeders. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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In More Cities, That Doggie In The Window Is Not For Sale
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Kari Neumeyer feeds her dogs, Leo and Mia, a raw food diet supplemented by kibble, which she says is more natural than commercial dog food. Rob Eis/Courtesy of Kari Neumeyer hide caption

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Courtney Martin jogs through the snow with her dog, Theodore, in St. Louis. Missourians and their pets muddled through another frigid day Tuesday. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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