The Simon family's new dog, displaced New Yorker Daisy. Elise Simon hide caption

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Elise Simon

Simon: Pets Find Their Way Into Our Hearts When We Need Them Most

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Ginger, an English bulldog, stands watch while at work with her owner, Will Pisnieski, at Authentic Entertainment in Burbank, Calif., in 2012. According to the Society for Human Resource Management, 7 percent of employers allow pets at work. Grant Hindsley/AP hide caption

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Grant Hindsley/AP

Who Let The Dogs In? More Companies Welcome Pets At Work

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Prime Minister David Cameron's cat, Larry, sits on the steps of No. 10 Downing St. in London on June 24, the day Brexit voting results were announced. If the Cameron family wants to take Larry along on holiday to France, a Brexit could complicate plans. It's possible that traveling to and from the EU with pets will grow more cumbersome. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

Ken (left) and Henry were created using DNA plucked from a skin cell of Melvin, the beloved pet of Paula and Phillip Dupont of Lafayette, La. Edmund D. Fountain for NPR hide caption

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Edmund D. Fountain for NPR

Cloning Your Dog, For A Mere $100,000

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Hard to resist. But if they're marijuana edibles, not such a treat. James A. Guilliam/Getty Images hide caption

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James A. Guilliam/Getty Images

When Pets Do Pot: A High That's Not So Mighty

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The walls inside Dog Mountain's chapel are filled with thousands of notes, cards and photos, all heartfelt tributes to pets loved and lost. Carlton SooHoo/Courtesy of Dan Collison hide caption

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Carlton SooHoo/Courtesy of Dan Collison

At Vermont's Dog Mountain, Comfort And Community For Pet Lovers

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A direct, friendly gaze seems to help cement the bond of affection between people and their pooches. Dan Perez/Flickr hide caption

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Dan Perez/Flickr

Scientists Probe Puppy Love

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