A U.S. Coast Guard crew retrieves a canister dropped by parachute in the Arctic in 2011. Over the past four decades, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and several other universities have studied shifts in atmospheric circulation above the Arctic. NASA/Kathryn Hansen hide caption

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NASA/Kathryn Hansen

Temperatures are up and ice cover is down in the Arctic this year. Scientists say climate change is altering the region faster than other parts of the planet. Greenland Travel via Flickr hide caption

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Greenland Travel via Flickr

Arctic Is Warming At 'Astonishing' Rates, Researchers Say

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The Crystal Serenity, pictured here in Seward, Alaska, is the largest cruise ship to traverse the Northwest Passage, traveling from Alaska to New York City. Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio hide caption

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Rachel Waldholz/Alaska Public Radio

In Warmer Climate, A Luxury Cruise Sets Sail Through Northwest Passage

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Sea ice melts off the beach of Barrow, Alaska, where Operation IceBridge is based for its summer 2016 campaign. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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Kate Ramsayer/NASA

As July's Record Heat Builds Through August, Arctic Ice Keeps Melting

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A typical apartment building in Roslyakovo. Russian President Vladimir Putin signed papers ordering the town to open its doors to the world on Jan. 1, 2015. Mary Louise Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Mary Louise Kelly/NPR

A Once-Closed Russian Military Town In The Arctic Opens To The World

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The new Russian nuclear-powered icebreaker Arktika launches in St. Petersburg, Russia, on Thursday. Russia has been modernizing its icebreaker fleet as part of its efforts to strengthen its Arctic presence. Evgeny Uvarov/AP hide caption

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Evgeny Uvarov/AP

Nuuk, Greenland's capital, hosted about 2,000 people for this year's Arctic Winter Games. It was the biggest event ever held in Greenland. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

At Arctic Winter Games, Biathlons, Stick Pulls And Sledge Jumps

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Floodwaters from rising sea levels have submerged and killed trees in Bedono village in Demak, Central Java, Indonesia. As oceans warm, they expand and erode the shore. Residents of Java's coastal villages have been hit hard by rising sea levels in recent years. Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images hide caption

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Ulet Ifansasti/Getty Images

Science Confirms 2014 Was Hottest Yet Recorded, On Land And Sea

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The Polar Star completes ice drills in the Arctic in July 2013. Built in the 1970s and only meant to last 30 years, the vessel is the U.S. Coast Guard's only heavy icebreaker. U.S. Coast Guard/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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U.S. Coast Guard/Reuters/Landov

As The Arctic Opens Up, The U.S. Is Down To A Single Icebreaker

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To put their probes into the Arctic Ice, researchers hitched a ride on a South Korean icebreaker. Courtesy of Craig M. Lee/University of Washington hide caption

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Courtesy of Craig M. Lee/University of Washington

Navy Funds A Small Robot Army To Study The Arctic

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