The long lifespan of the Greenland shark, shown here in the cold, deep waters of the Uummannaq Fjord, may only be surpassed by that of the ocean quahog, a clam known to live as long as 507 years. Julius Nielsen/Science hide caption

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Talk About An Ancient Mariner! Greenland Shark Is At Least 272 Years Old

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Marine ecologist Neil Hammerschlag says he can sometimes identify sharks like Emma (pictured) by the way they move. "It's pretty cool to be able to jump in the water and say, 'Hey look, there's Emma the tiger shark!' " Neil Hammerschlag hide caption

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A Marine Ecologist On Swimming With Sharks And What 'Jaws' Got Wrong

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Hans Walters and his wife, Martha Hiatt, rock out with a sea lion named Bruiser. Alletta Cooper for StoryCorps hide caption

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This '80s Rock Frontman Knows: What Could Be More Metal Than Sharks?

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A waitress serves shark fin soup in a restaurant in Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province on Aug. 10, 2014. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A frilled shark swims in a tank after being found by a fisherman off Japan's coast in 2007. One of the rare creatures was recently caught in Australia, shocking fishermen. Awashima Marine Park/Getty Images hide caption

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This mako shark looks like its ancient ancestors, but it's probably evolved to be even more terrifying. Sam Cahir/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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New Fossil Takes A Bite Out Of Theory That Sharks Barely Evolved

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John Hernandez of Kailua, Hawaii, who owns John's Fresh Fish, is shown on Thursday. In the background at right is a container ship owned by Matson Navigation Co. A pipe maintained by the company cracked and caused the molasses spill. Eugene Tanner/AP hide caption

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Fresh shark fins dry on the deck of an apprehended fishing boat in a declared shark and manta ray sanctuary located in the eastern region of Indonesia. Conservation International//Getty Images hide caption

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