A waitress serves shark fin soup in a restaurant in Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province on Aug. 10, 2014. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A frilled shark swims in a tank after being found by a fisherman off Japan's coast in 2007. One of the rare creatures was recently caught in Australia, shocking fishermen. Awashima Marine Park/Getty Images hide caption

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This mako shark looks like its ancient ancestors, but it's probably evolved to be even more terrifying. Sam Cahir/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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The Two-Way

New Fossil Takes A Bite Out Of Theory That Sharks Barely Evolved

A 325 million-year-old fossil find shows that the gill structures of modern sharks are actually quite different from their ancient ancestors.

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John Hernandez of Kailua, Hawaii, who owns John's Fresh Fish, is shown on Thursday. In the background at right is a container ship owned by Matson Navigation Co. A pipe maintained by the company cracked and caused the molasses spill. Eugene Tanner/AP hide caption

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Fresh shark fins dry on the deck of an apprehended fishing boat in a declared shark and manta ray sanctuary located in the eastern region of Indonesia. Conservation International//Getty Images hide caption

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Click the image to see a full-size version. At least eight shark species, many endangered or threatened, were found in bowls of shark fin soup across the country. Pew Environment Group hide caption

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