Imam Johari Abdul-Malik (center), of Dar Al-Hijrah Islamic Center in Northern Virginia, speaks alongside other leaders of the Muslim community during a December 2015 news conference in Washington, D.C., about growing "Islamophobia" in the United States. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Push To Name Muslim Brotherhood A Terrorist Group Worries U.S. Offshoots

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/520299701/521414826" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Supporters attend a gathering for Jordan's National Alliance for Reform, a political bloc including the Muslim Brotherhood, in Amman's Sweileh District last September. "In a lot of countries, we are in partnership with governments and parliament," says a brotherhood spokesman in Amman. Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Khalil Mazraawi/AFP/Getty Images

Muslim Brotherhood, Mainstream In Many Countries, May Be Listed As Terrorist Group

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/516437938/516583005" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood's third-highest ranking member and a main financier of the banned movement, Khayrat al-Shater (second from left), and other defendants flash the four-finger salute during their trial in Cairo, Egypt, on Saturday. Ousted President Mohammed Morsi, who was among them, received the death penalty. Khaled Elfiqi/EPA/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Khaled Elfiqi/EPA/Landov

Relatives and supporters of Egyptian activist Alaa Abdel Fattah react after Monday's verdict in a trial over an illegal protest. Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty Images

A man carries an Egyptian police officer to an ambulance after Friday's blast at the Egyptian police headquarters in downtown Cairo. Khalil Hamra/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Khalil Hamra/AP

Ballots are seen at a polling station in Cairo on Wednesday, the second day of voting in a referendum on a new constitution. Mohammed Bendari /APA /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Mohammed Bendari /APA /Landov

Japan's Mizuho Financial Group Inc. said it had punished a total of 54 current and former executives over its loans to organized crime groups, but a third-party panel found no sign of a deliberate cover-up. Mizuho Bank president Yasuhiko Sato said his salary would be cut for six months and other executives would step down from their posts or face pay reductions. Frank Robichon/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

toggle caption
Frank Robichon/EPA /LANDOV