Gov. Bill Haslam speaks to reporters after announcing in Nashville, Tenn., on Monday that that he had decided against creating a state-run health insurance exchange. The Republican governor said he will leave it to the federal government to run the marketplace. Erik Schelzig/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Arkansas Gov. Mike Beebe speaks about expanding Medicaid during a speech to the Arkansas State Chamber of Commerce in Little Rock, Ark., on Nov. 14. The federal government hasn't set a deadline for states to decide on their Medicaid expansion plans. Danny Johnston/AP hide caption

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Feds Say 'No' To Partial Medicaid Expansion

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Administration Lays Down Rules For Future Health Insurance

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Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman announced Thursday that his state will choose the federal health insurance exchange program. Nati Harnik/AP hide caption

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Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam said last week the state could design its own health insurance exchange required under President Obama's health care law. But resistance in the Republican-controlled General Assembly may cause the state to hand that power off to the federal government. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Health Insurance Exchanges Explained

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Obamacare Is Here To Stay, But In What Form?

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In June, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney was making the case for the repeal of the administration's health law. With his defeat, the law is looking secure. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Denver Health has a network of clinics to keep track of patients discharged from its hospital. Denver Health hide caption

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Medicare Dings Hospitals For Too Many Repeat Customers

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Mitt Romney's Shifting Stance On Health Care

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Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius joins Democratic senators at a news conference on Capitol Hill on Tuesday to announce new preventive health coverage for women that takes effect Wednesday. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Under Health Law, 'No-Cost' Birth Control Starts Today

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When the U.S. Supreme Court made a Medicaid expansion optional under the Affordable Care Act, the decision lowered the estimated cost of the law. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Texas Slow To Review Health Insurance Rate Hikes

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